Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Harry Potter Reading Activities

Harry Potter Reading Activities: Teaching Emotional Intelligence and Character

The Harry Potter series is an amazing piece of literature that teaches students a love of reading, yet also teaches emotional intelligence! The characters compelling stories of courage, honor, perseverance, and sacrifice give students a chance to be all those things. The Brothers Grimm fairy tales and Aesop’s fables taught countless generations of children characters and morals using morality tales. Today we need literature that treats kids as smart intelligent beings that flourish when exposed to insightful complex literature. Morality, sacrifice, empathy, and honesty are just a few themes that kids discover in the pages of Harry Potter. Harry Potter can be a roadmap for children to an emotionally intelligent adulthood. My class discusses and ruminates on the many themes that present themselves as we read the Harry Potter series, and students have so many insightful moments when they relate funny, poignant, scary moments to personal experience.

Idesa for Using Harry Potter in the Classroom to Teach Emotional Intelligence
  • Compare and Contrast Character Traits: Harry Potter vs. Hermione...
  • Make a list of what makes a character evil or good
  • Create your own Harry Potter chapter story using a classic morality theme
Harry Potter is not about witchcraft and wizardry as some opponents have argued, the books are about friendship and growing up. We should count ourselves fortunate and blessed when all generations learn the skills of caring, empathy, sacrifice, acceptance, and honor. If you have not read Harry Potter or you have not visited the books in a few years its time to rethink all the wonderful teachable moments that the series provides.  Sean Taylor The Reading Sage
        

Monday, July 23, 2012

Google’s 80–20 Rule for Educators and Teaching!


Google’s 80–20 Rule for Educators, Students and Teaching!

“GOOGLE engineers are encouraged to take 20 percent of their time to work on something company-related that interests them personally. This means that if you have a great idea, you always have time to run with it.” New York Times

Imagine giving students 20% of their instructional day to whatever fascinates them personally; will they build a passion for learning? Google uses the 80/20 rule for building loyalty, creating a culture of innovation, cultivating ideas, and acknowledging the creativity and productivity of working on self guided passions.

The 80/20 Rule can be used as the foundation of a flipped classroom, front loaded instruction 20%, and student work/collaboration 80%.

Food For Thought

The Pareto principle or 80–20 rule
  • 80% of students success comes from 20% of instruction and studying
  • 80% of students academic knowledge comes from 20% of the time spent on academic learning
  • 80% of lessons are unproductive (meeting the needs of all students) 20% of lessons are productive
  • 80% of students need differentiation (pacing, higher or lower level) 20% of students are on instructional level
  • 80% of classroom behavior problems come from 20% of students (academic and social and emotional)
Wiki Article
The Pareto principle (also known as the 80–20 rule, the law of the vital few, and the principle of factor sparsity) states that, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.
Business-management consultant Joseph M. Juran suggested the principle and named it after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who observed in 1906 that 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population; he developed the principle by observing that 20% of the pea pods in his garden contained 80% of the peas.[2]
It is a common rule of thumb in business; e.g., "80% of your sales come from 20% of your clients". Mathematically, where something is shared among a sufficiently large set of participants, there must be a number k between 50 and 100 such that "k% is taken by (100 − k)% of the participants". The number k may vary from 50 (in the case of equal distribution, i.e. 100% of the population have equal shares) to nearly 100 (when a tiny number of participants account for almost all of the resource). There is nothing special about the number 80% mathematically, but many real systems have k somewhere around this region of intermediate imbalance in distribution.[3]
The Pareto principle is only tangentially related to Pareto efficiency, which was also introduced by the same economist. Pareto developed both concepts in the context of the distribution of income and wealth among the population Wiki

Friday, July 20, 2012

MCAS released test | MCAS practice test Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.

MCAS Reading, ELA, Math, Science, History released test | MCAS practice test Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, MCAS reading, math, history and science practice test Grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Use the MCAS Tests below to prepare for the math, reading and science 2012-2013 MCAS assessment. The MCAS reading, math and science are standardized tests given to students in Massachusetts grades 3-8. Beyond grade 8, take the End of Course Tests for students in grades 9 to 12.

The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System, commonly shortened to MCAS is the Commonwealth's statewide standards-based assessment program developed in 1993, in response to the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of the same year. State and federal law mandates that all students who are enrolled in the tested grades and who are educated with Massachusetts public funds participate in MCAS testing.

MCAS has three primary purposes:
  1. To inform and improve curriculum and instruction.
  2. To evaluate student, school, and district performance according to Massachusetts Curriculum Framework content standards and Performance Standards.
  3. To determine student eligibility for the Competency Determination requirement in order to award high school diplomas.


MCAS RELEASED TEST

Free Printable Reading Comprehension Worksheets/Workbooks with Multiple Choice Questions

Grade / Class Reading Comprehension Worksheets 2013
Grade 3 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension
Grade 4 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension.
Grade 5 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension
Grade 6 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension
Grade 7 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension
Grade 8 English Language Arts Reading Comprehension
Grade / Class Reading Comprehension Worksheets 2012
MCAS 2015 Released ItemsGrade 3
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 4
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 5
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 6
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 7
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 8
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 10
English Language Arts
Mathematics
High School
Biology
Chemistry*
Introductory Physics
Technology/Engineering

TerraNova ELA, Reading and Math Practice Test
Grade 3 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 
Grade 4 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 
Grade 5 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 
Grade 6 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 
Grade 7 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 
Grade 8 Language Arts Language Arts Key Reading Reading Key Math Math Key 



From http://www.mhschool.com
Terranova Math Grade 2 Practice
Terranova Math Grade 3 Practice
Terranova Math Grade 4 Practice
Terranova Math Grade 5 Practice
Terranova Math Grade 6 Practice


MCAS 2014

Grade 3
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 4
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 5
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 6
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 7
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 8
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 10
English Language Arts
Mathematics
High School
Biology
Chemistry
Introductory Physics
Technology/Engineering


MCAS Release of Spring 2013 Test Items
Introduction
Grade 3
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 4
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 5
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 6
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 7
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Grade 8
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Science and Technology/Engineering
Grade 10
English Language Arts
Mathematics
High School
Biology
Chemistry
Introductory Physics
Technology/Engineering




Testing Vocabulary 3rd , 4th , 5th and 6th Grade

High Frequency Standardized Testing Vocabulary
This is a list of No Excuses Testing Vocabulary for the 3rd , 4th , 5th and 6th Grade. The Testing Vocabulary is the Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary for Reading and ELA Testing, it does not contain the Tier 3 Testing Vocabulary. You will also need to study the Tier 3 Academic Testing Vocabulary for thorough test prep. Students with developing reading skills or second language learners may need extra instruction to gain the full meaning of these words.

TIER 2 ACADEMIC VOCABULARY GLOSSARY
More High Incidence Testing Vocabulary
Tier 3 Academic Vocabulary Words

passage/s, mostly, mainly, different, based, order, paragraph, routine, events, speaker/s, most likely, lesson, suggest, comparison, describe/s, purpose, selection, according, event/s, section, statement/s, main idea, compares, contrast, selection, greatest, description, suggest, considered, organized, reason,  provided, preventing, represent, important details, decides, theme, presented, phrases, turning point, examples, predict/ed, cause, effect, differ, article, summary, diagram, instructions, directions, probably, detail, supports, term, organizes, definition, probably, closely 

High Frequency Standardized Testing Math Vocabulary
correctly, nearest, seems, diagram, combination, labeled, different, describes, relationship, common, represent/s, figure, model, combined, characteristic, according, examples, receive, statement, symbol, compare/s, patterns, section, arranged, display, input, output, value, expression, assigned, decreasing, results, designed, produced, constant, previous

passage/s

A portion or section of a written work; a paragraph, verse, etc.
There was a very funny passage in the student's response.

mostly
Almost; for the most part; nearly
My homework is mostly done.

mainly
For the most part; chiefly; primarily
The band's members are mainly girls.

different
Not alike; dissimilar; not identical
I didn't recognize her at first because her hair was so different.

based
The bottom support of anything; foundation; basis
He based his answer on the dictionary definition.

order
The listing of things by some characteristic, eg., first letter; size, color, age
The student names were listed in alphabetical order.

paragraph
The portion of written matter dealing with one idea, usually beginning with an indentation on a new line.
The paragraph had an excellent topic sentence.

routine
Regular; typical or everyday activity
Singing is part of the routine in Mr. Taylor's class.

speaker/s
A person who talks or is talking
Mrs. Kuhn was the speaker at the school assembly.

most likely
Best chance of happening; highest probability
If you don't do your homework, you will most likely get into trouble in Mr. Taylor's class.

lesson
Something to be learned or studied; part of a book, an exercise, etc., assigned for study
The math lesson for today is long division.

suggest
To propose an idea for consideration
Please suggest methods for encouraging students to do their homework.

comparison
Likening; reviewing similarities
There is no comparison between driving and flying to New York.

describe/s
To tell about; to list important characteristics; to draw a picture to represent something
Please describe Rio Vista Elementary School.

purpose
The reason for doing something; the reason something exists or is done, made, used, etc.
The purpose for homework is to give students practice in reading, writing, and arithmetic.
selection


PARCC Grade 3 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test 
Paper-Based Practice Test 
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test 
Accommodated Screen Reader Version 
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)

PARCC Grade 3 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test 
Paper-Based Practice Test 
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test 
Accommodated Screen Reader Version 
American Sign Language Version Braille ASCII File (.brf)
GRADE 4 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test
GRADE 4 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version Braille ASCII File (.brf)
GRADE 5 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test
GRADE 5 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)
GRADE 6 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test

GRADE 6 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version Braille ASCII File (.brf)
GRADE 7 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test
GRADE 7 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version Braille ASCII File (.brf)


GRADE 8 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test
GRADE 8 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
GRADE 9 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Answer Document Braille ASCII File (.brf)
GRADE 9 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
GRADE 10 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version Braille ASCII File (.brf)

GRADE 10 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Answer Document Braille ASCII File (.brf)

GRADE 11 Part 1 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Braille ASCII File (.brf)Close Captioning Practice Test

GRADE 11 Part 2 Practice Tests
Computer-Based Practice Test
Paper-Based Practice Test
Large Print Paper-Based Practice Test
TTS Practice Test
Accommodated Screen Reader Version
American Sign Language Version
Answer Document Braille ASCII File (.brf)


Common Core Practice Test Math and ELA
Grade 3 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 3 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 4 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 4 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 5 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 5 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 6 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 6 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 7 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 7 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 8 ELA Annotated 2013 State Test Questions
Grade 8 Mathematics Annotated 2013 State Test Questions


Most of the Common Core assessments follow the standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). State that have high standards based on the NCTM and NCTE will find the Common Core very familiar.

The Common Core Standards will be implemented fully in 2014-2015 in 47 states. The Standards are 1.5 standard deviations above today’s mean. Publishers (Harcourt Educational Measurement, CTB McGraw-Hill, Riverside Publishing (a Houghton Mifflin company), and NCS Pearson) and software developers (NWEA MAP) are writing and developing criterion/standards based assessments that meet the new higher standards. Teachers need to have access to assessments that give a baseline of skills and ability to meet these higher standards TODAY! The best free resource for teachers to do test prep and asses student readiness are the TAKS and CRCT released test. Teachers may want to use the grade higher to make sure they are evaluating student readiness.

PARCC Prototype Test Items for Common Core Assessments | PARCC Assessments Released Items | PARCC Released test sample ELA Grade 3, 6, 7, 10 | PARCC Released test sample MATH Grade 3, 4, 6, 7, High School

Sample of State assessments that are similar to the Common Core Standards

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 MCAS ELA Reading & Math Test Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System
MCAS ELA Reading & Math Test Release of Spring 2015-2016 Test Items

Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6
Grade 7
Grade 8
Grade 10
High School
Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System
Release of Spring 2014 Test Items


Grade 3
Grade 4
Grade 5
Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

High School

Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System

Release of Spring 2013 Test Items

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

High School

Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System

Release of Spring 2012 Test Items

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

High School

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

High School


Wednesday, July 18, 2012

Project-Based Learning | Flipped CLASS | PBL


Project-Based Learning and or a Flipped CLASS? 

Flipped Teaching and project based learning using the Common Core State Standards! 

Is a flipped class and projects based learning possible in today’s publisher driven, top-down curriculum model and austere school reform mentality we find ourselves working in? Giving teachers the power to make real academic choices, teacher-student selected curriculum, flipping a class, and or using project-based learning. Today classrooms are hindered with such severe cutbacks that many are closer to daycare than centers of innovative learning. Teachers are on the front lines of education and need support to do what is in the best interest of the child’s learning, not focused on test taking ability.  

Students in Finland are consistently ranked at the Top in Math and Science achievement! Why, because teachers focus on educational equity (student outcomes as related to learning) , not ranking, labeling, accountability or competition! Finland amazingly rejected the "Accountability Movement" 20 years ago and decided to develop a teacher-student centered learning model. They do not administer standardized or criterion referenced test! Teachers are free to make students learning the priority!

Texas administered the new STAAR test this summer, with standards that are similar to the CCSS, and guess what, TEST scores plummeted. Higher standards do not improve teacher or student outcomes. Most of the newly published CCSS materials that I have read are really just reshuffled old materials disguised as new and innovative. Schools will spend millions and millions getting ready to realign curriculum with the CCSS, and what we really need to do is realign our philosophy.  Empower teachers and create an innovative nurturing learning environment for both the teacher and the student.When do we honor teachers and treat them as intelligent professionals? 

The Common Core Standards are adding even higher expectations to today's stretched students and teachers, that of course means testing expectations are unreachable/unmeetable/unteachable, in many of today’s austere classrooms. My schools started this year with 32 full day kindergartners in each class with no aide! That is austere!

This year districts and schools will start choosing the best from the worst published curriculum that supposedly meets the CCSS because we don't trust our teachers to develop their own innovative amazing curriculum. Finnish teachers collaborate daily from 1:30-3:00 to develop teacher made curriculum and work with colleagues to meet the needs of all student. Project-based learning and a flipped classrooms are possible if we give teachers the power to make real decisions (picking what published program your school will use doesn't count) and the control!


Ideas to help keep the learning flowing and the innovative classroom alive:
  • Team Teaching
  • Students as teachers or peer teachers
  • Intermediate classrooms adopt a primary classroom
  • More flexibility in school schedules!!!! (Why we run schools today on military schedules is beyond me)
  • Real curriculum development and planning time
Flipped Classroom Explained: wiki  

Flip teaching is a form of blended learning which encompasses any use of Internet technology to leverage the learning in a classroom, so a teacher can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing. This is most commonly being done using teacher created videos that students view outside of class time. It is also known as backwards classroom, reverse instruction and reverse teaching.
The traditional pattern of secondary education has been to have classroom lectures, in which the teacher explains a topic, followed by homework, in which the student does exercises. In flip teaching, the student first studies the topic by himself, typically using video lessons created by the instructor or shared by another educator, such as those provided by the Khan Academy. In the classroom, the pupil then tries to apply the knowledge by solving problems and doing practical work. The role of the classroom teacher is then to tutor the student when they become stuck, rather than to impart the initial lesson. This allows time inside the class to be used for additional learning-based activities, including use of differentiated instruction and project-based learning.
Flip teaching allows more hands-on time with the instructor guiding the students, allowing them to assist the students when they are assimilating information and creating new ideas (upper end of Bloom's Taxonomy).


Project Based Learning: Explained
Project-based learning, or PBL, is the use of in-depth and rigorous classroom projects to facilitate learning and assess student competence (not to be confused with problem-based learning). Project Based Learning was promoted by the Buck Institute for Education in the late 1990s, in response to school reform efforts of that time. Project-based learning is an instructional method that provides students with complex tasks based on challenging questions or problems that involve the students' problem solving, decision making, investigative skills, and reflection that includes teacher facilitation, but not direction. PBL is focused on questions that drive students to encounter the central concepts and principles of a subject hands-on. Students form their own investigation of a guiding question, allowing students to develop valuable research skills as students engage in design, problem solving, decision making, and investigative activities. Through Project-based learning, students learn from these experiences and take them into account and apply them to the world outside their classroom. PBL is a different teaching technique that promotes and practices new learning habits, emphasizing creative thinking skills by allowing students to find that there are many ways to solve a problem.


Wednesday, July 11, 2012

Teaching Emotional Intelligence Using Music

Teaching Emotional Intelligence, Values, Morals, and Character with Music | Grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 | Values and Character | Emotional Intelligence Lessons

Emotional Intelligence is a bigger predictor of academic success due in part; students with high Emotional Intelligence adapt better to a modern classroom. Teaching students empathy, compassion, humility, character, honor, duty and civility is more important today with the changes to society. Character and values lessons start in the home with parents and elders telling fairytales and fables to educate the young about right and wrong. Young ones learned about the perils of lying, pride, anger and selfishness vicariously and safely though the characters in the stories. I use music in addiction to fairytales and fables to build emotional intelligence.
      
Music is a powerful tool that evokes positive, inspirational, and even sympathetic emotions and impacts perception of content. We know that adding or stimulating emotions stimulates learning and speeds retention and memory. Think of all the movies, plays, and concerts that have amazed and inspired you with music. Create a sound track for your daily classroom lessons and watch students emotional intelligence increases and learning ignites.

Music can take the rote or mundane task that must be mastered and make them Epic in Importance with the right music!

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Teachers Resume | Sample Resume


Curriculum Vitae (CV) | Teacher Résumé | Teacher Cover Letter 
The importance of a teacher resume or curriculum vitae (CV)! A CV or resume provides an overview of a teachers experience and educational qualifications. A CV is typically the first item that a potential employer encounters regarding the job seeker and is typically used to screen applicants, often followed by an interview, when seeking a teaching position.

Sean D. Taylor, M.Ed
            (520) 245-----  readingsage@gmail.com  

To:  Principals and Administrators:     

July 9, 2012

Dear Colleagues and Friends:

I am pleased to present my résumé and Curriculum Vitae for your consideration as a curriculum / reading specialist in your district. I am confident that my academic background, teaching experience and curriculum development skills can serve your mission, and help produce improved outcomes like those I have seen in my own classroom, and in the classrooms of teachers with whom I have worked.

Beginning in 2005 I developed and implemented an effective four-week compensatory reading intervention program/literacy curriculum sequence for primary and intermediate students. In the subsequent years, participants in my classroom and other classrooms have seen a significant increase in literacy scores as measured by the NWEA MAP assessment and criterion-referenced testing or "standards based assessment."

The inception of Reading Boot Camp as an intervention program involved a total of 20 extraordinary teachers, from three different schools, all of whom wanted to pilot a teacher-developed intervention. The school district and three of the schools failed AYP in the previous years. We implemented the curriculum sequence in the two weeks before the state testing window in grades 2 through 5, and outcomes were dramatic: 95% of the students in 95% of participating classrooms passed the State Reading assessments. We were thrilled by the flood of positive responses from teachers, students, and parents, and, perhaps most significantly, all three schools made AYP that year. In the years since, 90% off all students participating in the full 20 day program passed all State reading tests.

I am inspired to broaden the influence of this influential program. I’m committed to finding a position that enables me to help teachers and students discover innovative ways to improve student literacy. On a personal note, I believe my own experience with dyslexia and my inability to read during primary school affords me uncommon insight into helping all students learn to read.

Please consider this Letter of Interest and attached résumé as an expression of my sincere interest in pursuing any curriculum/education specialist opportunities that may arise in your district. I welcome the chance to arrange a formal interview, or to simply chat about possibilities. Thank you for your time and consideration.


Sincerely,

Sean D Taylor M.Ed.