Sunday, November 22, 2015

Paired Reading Passages | Close Reading | Socratic Seminars

Close Reading | Socratic Seminars | Paired Reading Passages 

Title: A Short History Of Cats & Facts about Cats: Do you know this and that about Cats? Word Count: 1173

CCSSR ELA Reading Writing: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

It seems strange that there was ever a time when cats were not a fun part of our families. It's
been less that 10,000 years since cats swaggered into our lives. Hardly an eye blink in the grand sweep of human history on this planet. Why were cats so late to join our clans and tribes? The simple answer is they didn't need humans to survive. Cats were surviving just fine on their own. Then, people invented agriculture. Agriculture resulted in large scale storage of grains which attracted the usual and well know group of freeloaders, mice, and rats. Grain attracted rodents. Rodents attracted cats who consider them tasty meals. The result was that cats set up housekeeping close to human settlements. Eventually, cats being cats, moved right on in.

Who were these first cats? The first clue lies in where agriculture was first practiced. Agriculture first took root (no pun intended) in the Middle East in a great sweep from modern day Turkey to Egypt. Within this area ranges the African wild cat, Felis libyca. African wild cats are slightly larger that our modern house cats and are yellow in color with muted stripes. These cats have a docile, almost laid back nature. Interestingly, these cats still tend to live and hunt near human dwellings today. Locals still like to catch and rear young wild cats as pets. When mature, wild cats raised by humans tend to behave very much like our familiar housecats. A very good case can (and has) been advanced designating Felis libyca as the principal founding population for domestic cats. At least two other varieties of wild cat are speculated to have contributed to the genetic makeup of domestic cats. One is Felis silvestris, The European wildcat who appears to have contributed darker markings and a peppery spirit to the African wild cat base. Also, from Asia, comes the Pallas or Steppe cat (Felis manul) that appears to have contributed long-haired coats to the mix.

The early period of domestication of cats is vague with only patches of evidence. However, by 6,000 B.C. statues found in Anatolia (modern Turkey) show women playing with domestic cats. Cats had clearly become common and affectionate pets by that time. The earliest written records about cats appear by approximately 4,000 B.C. in Egypt where they were frequently kept to hunt mice and rats from stored grains. It was a good time to be a cat in ancient Egypt. Domestic cats were thought to be the embodiment of the goddess Bast (or Bastet). There was a necropolis at her principal temple at Bubastis that contained mummified cats.

Romans spread the domestic cat northward into central Europe and westward to Britain during the expansion of their empire. Cats were quickly adopted and admired as great hunters. And they continued to move north and east in Europe. The Vikings used cats as both rodent hunters and pets. The Viking goddess of love and war, Freyja, was associated with cats. Huge winged cats drew her chariot. It also became the custom to give new brides a kitten in her name.

The Middle Ages it was a very bad time to be a cat. Cats were said to be witches familiars, in league with the devil. Because of this superstition, cats were routinely killed during festivals. Sometimes they were even burned alive or thrown off tall buildings. The Europeans paid heavily for their cruelty to cats. The deaths of so many cats allowed the rodent population to rise out of control, bringing in the Black Death which killed so much of the European population. Eventually, the cats' cleanly ways and hunting prowess redeemed them in the eyes of the people of Europe. By the 1600s, people in France began putting little holes near the bottom of their doors to allow their cats to enter and leave as they please.

In Asia, cats continued to be familiar hunters and cherished pets. Cats were often subjects for drawing and painting in China. In Japan, cats in the form of Maneki Neko, usually portrayed as a sitting cat with one paw raised and bent, are considered good fortune. They are often found in businesses to draw in money.

The history of cats is a fascinating one, worthy of much more in-depth study. It fosters an appreciation for the personalities and talents of our pets.

Title: Facts about Cats: Do you know this and that?
Cats are fascinating members of the animal kingdom. Wherever they are, cats are very interesting creatures and they possess exquisite characteristics. How much do you know about cats? Well, we hope to add your knowledge of the domestic cat (Felis catus or Felis silvestris catus):
  • Did you know that cats can see 6 times better than human beings? Yes, according to studies, it is during nighttime when cats can really see more than we can.
  • Cats exist from the hot deserts of Africa to icy cold Greenland; you will find them in every corner of the world. They may have varied looks or characteristics by counting in the different factors.
  • Just like dogs, cats can swim, they dot not have Aquaphobia,  but water is avoided.
  • An eighteen-hour nap is achievable by cats in hot countries. These areas include desert-like areas and in some latitudes of the tropics.
  • There are many different breeds of cats and most of them have varied and different characteristics.
  • One amazing cat may have inspired the ancient Egyptians. The Sphynx. is a mythical creature with, as a minimum, the head of a human and the body of a lion. 
  • There are cats called Manx which originate from the Isle of Man and that they do not have tails. They just have this so-called stub. 
  • Who is the fastest land animal on the planet? The Cheetah is, of course, another member of the cat family. 
  • There are also fishing cats which really show great skills in catching fish. The fishing cat (Prionailurus viverrinus) is a medium-sized wild cat of South and Southeast Asia.
These tidbits are just some of those cool yet factual things about cats. When your aim is to explore more about these animals, you could always use the power of the internet in order to familiarize yourself with the world around you.


When you wish to have your own cat, you could also consider those factors that may make or break your choice. There are actually different choices of cats for pets. In general, cats are very good pets for they are very affectionate.


According to research, owning cats as pets is most beneficial for ill or old patients. It has been found out that animals like cats could reduce their depression and other negative feelings brought by solitude and sickness.



CCSS INTENSIVE READING SKILLS WORKBOOK IDEA?

HOT READING SKILLS NONWORKBOOKs (FREE Open Source Reading Resources)

Prepare your students with intensive DOK level 3 and 4 two-step reading comprehension questions, targeted word studyrigorous word analysis, skills-building daily reading comprehension practice that students need to pass demanding standards-based reading assessments. Each HOT/BOSS READING SKILLS workbook will include more than 40 fun intensive reading lessons.

Sample Cover of a Monthly Read and Respons workbook that I would like to develop.

Intensive Reading Lessons!
 
  • Reading Comprehension questions: One‐Part Hot Text, Multiple Choice, Open Response, Multi‐Select, Evidence‐Based Selected Response, Two‐Part Hot Text,  Editing Task Questions, Technology Enhanced Constructed Response (TECR), Grid Select, Prose Constructed Response (PCR), and ELA-Applied Skills: ConstructedResponse, and Extended-Response. 
  • Weekly/Biweekly Word Study Games 
  • Weekly/Biweekly Socratic Seminars 
  • Weekly/Biweekly Latin and Greek Roots and Affixes HOT Sheets
  • Weekly/Biweekly Reading Game Cards: Tier 2 and 3 Academic Reading Vocabulary 
  • Daily Reading Fluency Passages: Socratic Seminare STEM questions included
  • Weekly/Biweekly Cornel Notes Word Analysis Journal Pages 
  • Weekly Fiction Literary Elements Hide and Seek Game 
  • Bimonthly Nonfiction Text Features Scavenger Hunt
  • Daily Tier 2 and 3 ELA Reading Glossaries Word Match Game
  • Weekly/Biweekly FUN, Silly, Foolish and Ingaging Reading Passages 
  • Daily Read and Response Reading Logs
  • Bimonthly Standards-Based Reading Comprehension Assessments 

Draft Non-Fiction Close Reading Test Passages: NEEDS EDITING! PLEASE HELP!
  1. 13-year-old Dutch girl, Laura Dekker sails Around the World
  2. Are Dogs Really Man’s Best Friend?
  3. Can you Win Arguments with Your Parents with Facts?
  4. Captain James Cook Mini Biography
  5. Claude Monet French Impressionist Painter
  6. College Knowledge: What do you need to know to succeed in college?
  7. Deforestation: Facts, Causes & Effects
  8. Eating Insects Is Common Around the World
  9. Extraordinary Astronomical Observatories of the World
  10. Getting Organized with Checklist
  11. How can we save the Honey Bee?
  12. How do Vaccines work?
  13. How to Start Your Own Business
  14. Is Clutter and Mess Really Best for Creativity?
  15. Living on the International Space Station
  16. Man’s Future Missions to Mars
  17. Mary Shelley an English novelist: Frankenstein
  18. Mary Stevenson Cassatt an American Painter
  19. Mini Benjamin Franklin Biography
  20. Mini Biography Astronaut Sally Ride
  21. Motivation Using Fear or Reason
  22. Norse explorer Leif Erikson Explores America 500 years before Columbus
  23. Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize
  24. RECYCLING FACTS & STATISTICS
  25. Renewable Resources, Wind Solar and Hydroelectric: FACTS & STATISTICS
  26. Sherlock Holmes: Man or mystery?
  27. The Baja 500 off-road race
  28. The Future of High Speed Trains
  29. The history of ice cream
  30. The History of the Taj Mahal
  31. The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
  32. The Story of the Titans
  33. The Truth about Pirates
  34. What is your carbon footprint?
  35. The History of the Taj Mahal
  36. What will happen if a giant comet hits the Earth?
  37. Who was Socrates?
  38. Why aren’t there more female engineers?
  39. Why We Crave Junk Food: Sugar and Fat?
  40. Will California Survive the Great Drought?
  41. A History of the Hanseatic League
  42. A Short History of the Battle Axe
  43. A Short History of the Cross Bow
  44. A Short History of the Dagger
  45. Child Labour and your Electronics
  46. Child Slavery and your Chocolate Bar
  47. Crocodile & Alligator Differences
  48. Top 10-15 scientists who changed the world: Marie Curie
  49. Myth vs. Fact Ancient Aliens Created the Nazca Lines
  50. Myth vs. Fact the Abominable Snowman
  51. Myth vs. Fact the Roswell Aliens
  52. Myth vs. Fact the Voodoo Zombies
  53. Neil Alden Armstrong the first person to walk on the Moon
  54. The Sonoran Desert Flora and Fauna
  55. Timeline of female labor and education in the early history of the US
  56. What is Project Based Learning?

  57. Coming Soon PAIRED READING PASSAGES WITH EBSR! 

    Top 10 Future Professions: 
    Data Scientist/Engineer (Machine Learning)
    Mechanical Engineer
    Physician.
    Physical Therapist.
    Civil Engineer.
    Information Security Analyst (Internet)
    Computer App Developer.
    Website Designer
    Metallurgical and Materials Engineering
    Database Administrator

    Science Articles: 
    Coastal Estuarine Food Chain/Web
    Tidepool Flora and Fauna
    Kelp Forest Ecosystems
    Coral Reef Systems: Great Barrier Reef
    Renewable Energy Resources Wind Turbine
    Renewable Energy Resources Solar Power
    Arizona Sky Islands Ecosystems
    Australia’s Uluru | Northern Territory
    Natural Phenomena: Earthquakes
    Natural Phenomena: Tsunamis
    Critically Endangered Species: Vaquita
    Critically Endangered Species: White Rhino
    Wilderness Medicine: Outdoor First Aide Essentials
    Medicinal plants
    Physical Phenomena: Electricity
    Physical Phenomena: Magnetism
    Natural Phenomena: Precipitation and The Hydrologic cycle
    Natural Phenomena: Weather and Lightning
    Earth-friendly Diet
    The Sugar Diet: Sugar Addiction

    Inspirational People:
    Anne Frank
    Joan of Arc
    Albert Einstein
    Stephen Hawking
    Nikola Tesla
    Thomas Edison
    World at War: Winston Churchill
    World at War: Franklin Delano Roosevelt
    Benjamin Franklin
    Thomas Jefferson

      Fiction Close Reading Passages

Christmas Classroom Handicraft

Christmas Classroom Handicraft | Finnish Formative Handicraft to Build Character and Social Emotional Intelligence | Wisdom of the Hand! 


Finnish Paper Snowflake
Educational sloyd's "Käsityö" purpose is formative in its design, and it is thought that the benefits of learning handicrafts "Käsityö" in a public school setting builds character and resilience in children! Educational Sloyd develops self reliance, encourages moral behavior, improves judgment, perseverance, an understanding of quality, encourages students to internalize high standards, develops greater intelligence and industriousness.
"Some aver that a course of scientific training in handicraft gives a boy or girl a new zeal for school work to such an extent that the progress of such a pupil is not only equal, but often exceeds, that of pupils whose attention is concentrated on a literary curriculum. If this is true, even to the extent a pupil under these conditions holds his own, he has the additional advantage of having learnt to use his hands, and his education as a result is "all sided." It has been said that "the true aim of education is the development of all the powers of man to the culminating point of action: and this power in the concrete--the power to do some useful thing for man--this must be the last analysis of educational truth" The Pedagogy of Educational Handicraft by T.W. Berry:1909 
Sloyd (Slöjd), also known as Educational sloyd, was a system of
My Handicraft Station 
 handicraft-based education started by Uno Cygnaeus in Finland in 1865. The system was further refined and promoted worldwide, including adoption in the United States, until the early 20th Century. A handicraft, sometimes more precisely expressed as artisanal handicraft or handmade, is any of a wide variety of types of work where useful and decorative objects are made completely by hand or by using only simple tools. It is a traditional main sector of craft, and applies to a wide range of creative and design activities that are related to making things with one's hands and skill, including work with textiles, moldable and rigid materials, paper, plant fibers, etc. Usually the term is applied to traditional techniques of creating items (whether for personal use or as products) that are both practical and aesthetic.



Hand Knitting 
Formative handicraft is a must do daily classroom activity that inspires a love of learning and teaches what is truly important in life, Curiosity, resilience, craftsmanship, perseverance and character! Social emotional intelligence and emotional resilience is created with ease using formative handicraft lessons that will inspire and motivate all students to thrive and strive.  Finnish School Schedule 
  

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Compare and Contrast Paired Reading Passages Hanukkah and Christmas

Compare and Contrast Paired Reading Passages with Socratic Seminar Ideas, Cornell Notes and DOK Questions | Hanukkah and Christmas

 Title: Hanukkah Cooking Traditions Word Count: 602
CCSSR ELA Reading Writing: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
1. Whether you are sincerely seeking fresh opportunities to explore different cultures or you are Jewish seeking great recipes and cooking tips for this important time of year you've come to the right place to be inspired. For as long as family traditions have been around eating good food at these gatherings and during these times has also been a part of the merriment. Unfortunately, all that great food cannot be eaten unless someone goes to the trouble of actually cooking it. If you are looking for some excellent treats to help with Hanukkah celebrations or simply want to get a taste of what other cultures experience during their religious or cultural celebrations there are plenty of great foods you should be cooking for this particular holiday.
2. Hanukkah is a holiday that commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem after a group of Jews rose up against the Greeks because they were not permitted to practice their religion. This became known as the Maccabean Revolt as the Jews were led by Judah Maccabee. After defeating the Greeks, the Jews lit the menorah (a seven-branched candelabra), but there was only enough oil to last for one day. Miraculously, the oil continued to burn for eight days, allowing the Jews to celebrate their victory while it burned. In remembrance, Hanukkah is celebrated for eight days each year by lighting the Hanukiah, which has eight candles for the eight nights and a ninth that is used to light the others.
3. Oil is important in the celebration of Hanukkah and, as a result, many of the foods that are part of Hanukkah traditions are prepared in oil. One popular favorite is potato Latkes, which are a type of potato pancake that is deep-fried. Another popular favorite is fried lamb chops. The lamb is breaded and then fried much like many Americans fry chicken. Once again oil is used in the preparation of the meal.


4. If you are looking for something more in line with finger foods or a snack sort of food you should consider deep-fried ricotta balls, fried zucchini, fried onion rings, and even fried mozzarella are good savory fried delights for the season of light. Of course, fried foods aren't everything that is eaten during this 8-day celebration but they do play a vital role on the menu and in the festivities.


5. Even the sweet treats for this celebration include a few fried goodies. From apple fritters and raspberry donuts, there are plenty of delicious fried foods for your snacking enjoyment. If you like something a little sinful to enjoy this delightful celebration you might like to try blintzes in your favorite flavor. There are many from which to choose and recipes can be found freely online for these delicious treats.


6. Other Hanukkah favorites include delicious dishes such as cheese platers, gelt coins, jelly donuts, vegetable kugel, and brisket. Once again the recipes for these dishes are fairly widely available online and in cookbooks that are dedicated to Jewish cooking and traditions.


7. Now that you have learned about these delicious dishes, why not try making some? Get our parents to help you heat up some oil to fry your favorite foods. Just be careful, hot oil can splash! This is a time that is supposed to be dedicated to celebration not pulling out your hair trying to cook the meals. The good news is that with so many deep fried foods it is unlikely that you will find these dishes too difficult to prepare. Good luck and have fun exploring the world of cooking for Hanukkah.

Title: Cooking Christmas Cookies with the Kids Word Count: 524
CCSSR ELA Reading Writing: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

1. Christmas cookies are as much a part of the Christmas tradition for many as a visit from Old St. Nick himself. The cookies are often prepared in hopes of his pending arrival by children that are as excited as they can possibly be with all sorts of visions of great things to come dancing around in their bright and shining little eyes. Preparing the cookies in these instances can be a great time of bonding with your family but can also be a trying time if you don't follow a few of the tips and hints listed below.

2. If you want to make cooking Christmas cookies and/or candy with your family the very best experience for you all that it can possibly be make sure you do it on a day when this is the only thing on your calendar. You do not want to rush through this time that is an important opportunity to lock in a few precious memories. This is one thing that you will want to look back at when you are older and reminisce about your holiday traditions with your family. 

3. You should also make sure that everyone is well rested and well fed before beginning the process. This is important now more than ever before, as we know more about the dangers of foods, such as raw eggs, that are included in cookie dough as well as the dough for many of our favorite Christmas confections and candies. You do not want to risk the health of your family through temptation over raw cookie dough.

4. Be sure that everyone gets a turn with the fun stuff. This includes, of course, using the mixer and watching things spin around as well as choosing your personal favorites for the next batch of cookies. You should also make a few sugar cookies that you plan to decorate and play with just for fun. This will guarantee lots of smiles while also scoring a few brownie points for bringing the Christmas tradition to life.

5. Be patient and expect spills, messes and mistakes. To make clean up more fun, why not turn it into a game? Try to find all the hidden sprinkles around the kitchen and decorate a garbage cookie! Seriously, don't sweat the small stuff. We make little messes every day, this shouldn’t be a road block to this fun holiday tradition. This is one of the reasons why you want to plan your cookie making on a day when the calendar is clear, you will need time for clean up when all is said and done.

6. Make sure you have all the necessary ingredients for each and every single recipe before you begin. This is very important as cookie dough doesn't wait well and you don’t want to spoil your fun by having to make a last minute trip to the grocery store for your forgotten eggs. (Kids, when was the last time your parents actually took only 15 minutes in the grocery store?). If you can make it through all the steps above you should be in for smooth sailing and Christmas cookie bliss.

NameDate:
Performance Objective:
Key Vocabulary:Seasonal. traditions, cultures
DOK Level
Level of DOK Descriptors
DOK Depth of Knowledge Focus:
1
Recall and Reproduction
    1. Students will compare and contrast elements, views, ideas, or events presented in one or more passages.
    2. Students will identify the interrelationships (themes, ideas, concepts) that are developed in more than one literary work
    3. Students will analyze the ways in which similar themes or ideas are developed in more than one text.
2
Connecting Basic Concepts and Skills/ Basic Reasoning
3
Strategic and Tactical Thinking/ Complex Reasoning
4
Extended Adroit Thinking (Deep Multistage)/Higher Order Thinking and Reasoning
Venn Diagram: Compare and Contrast
Framing Questions /Essential Questions: Compare and Contrastthe Holiday Traditions of Hanukkahand Christmas?

Anticipatory Set:
    1. Holiday and Seasonal Traditions
    2. review active participation in Socratic seminars
    3. relate past experience 

Socratic Seminar Direct Instruction:


Compare and Contrast Reading Strategies:


Modeling, Guided Practice, and Independent Practice

TEACHER MODELING:


GUIDED PRACTICE:


STUDENT PRACTICE:
Day One Closure and Review:




Exit Ticket Activity:

Summary/Reflections:





Christmas In European Countries

In Finland, Christmas Eve is the traditional time to set up the Christmas tree and it's also traditional to visit the sauna and for families to listen to a broadcast of the national 'Peace of Christmas' on the radio. Christmas dinner generally consists of a main dish of boiled codfish that is snowy and fluffy in appearance, served with cream sauce and boiled potatoes. Christmas dinner is rounded out with roast suckling pig or roasted fresh ham and vegetables. Among peasants, there is a tradition to tie a sheaf of grain, with nuts and seeds, to a pole that is put in a garden for birds. Many peasants will wait until after the birds have eaten before having their Christmas Dinner. And Santa Claus is expected to visit homes in person with his Christmas elves to give out Christmas gifts.

Christmas in France is called Noel, from the phrase 'les bonnes nouvelles,' or 'the good news,' which refers to the gospel. On Christmas Eve, cathedrals and churches are beautifully lit and filled with the sounds of Christmas carols, ringing church bells and carillons. The tradition among children is to put their shoes by the fireplace for Pere Noel or le petit Jesus to fill them with gifts.

In the north of France however, children receive gifts on Dec. 6, St. Nicholas Day, instead of Christmas. Most French homes will have a Nativity scene or crèche on display during the season. In Southern France, some people will burn a log in their home from Christmas Eve until New Years Day, which comes out of a
farming tradition of using the log for good luck in the coming harvest. The French also make a traditional cake called the buche de Noel, or Christmas Log, which is shaped like a Yule log and is part of a late supper called le reveillon held after Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. The main dish for this meal generally consists of poultry, ham, salads, cake, fruit and wine but varies according to region. The main course in Burgundy is turkey with chestnuts and in Paris it's oysters, foie gras and the buche de Noel cake. The wines generally served are Champagne, Muscadet, Sauterne and Anjou. An annual tradition of puppet shows, particularly in Paris and Lyons, is popular during Christmas time. In Paris, it's also popular for big department stores to have grand, animated window displays.

Christmas in Italy is called 'Il Natale,' or 'the birthday.' Christmas season starts eight days before Christmas, a period called the Novena, and runs for three weeks. During the Novena, children dress as shepherds and go from house to house saying Christmas poems, singing and playing pipes. They often receive money to buy gifts during this activity. The Nativity scene, called the Presepio, has miniature figures, carved in great detail out of clay or plaster, of the Holy Family in the stable and is the center of Christmas for families. Families say prayers and children recite poems around the Presepio. Christmas Eve dinner, called cenone, is a traditional dish of roasted, baked or fried eel. In some regions, various types of fish is prepared for this dinner, as well as pork, sausage in a pig's leg or turkey stuffed with chestnuts. Christmas sweets are called panettone and traditionally have nuts and almonds. On Christmas Eve, children set out their shoes for a kind, old woman or ugly witch called La Befana, who rides on a broomstick down chimneys, to fill them with gifts of toys or candies. If they were bad, their shoes will be filled with coal. Some children wait until Jan. 6, the Epiphany, to receive gifts.

Norway is where the tradition of the Yule log started and which gave rise to log-shaped cakes, cheese and other desserts during the holidays. Norwegians today often go into the forest to cut their own Christmas trees, which is secretly decorated on Christmas Eve to surprise children. After the Christmas tree is revealed, Norwegians engage in 'circling the Christmas tree,' a tradition in which everyone joins hands forming a ring around the tree. They then walk around the Christmas tree singing carols. Gifts are distributed after this ritual is finished.

Christmas Around the World

Christmas in the Birthplaces of Traditions -- Bethlehem, Germany and England Christmas as celebrated today is a culmination of centuries of traditions that are religious and secular and which came from different
countries around the world. It is interesting therefore to look at some of the general ways in which Christmas is celebrated in these countries. 

The traditions examined for each country will be examples of some of the things that are unique to that country and which are done today, or which were once done by people in those countries. 

To begin, it is symbolic to look at the town of Bethlehem, which is believed to be the birthplace of Jesus. The Church of the Nativity is located in Bethlehem and at Christmas it is decorated with a lot of flags and other Christmas decorations. A very large crowd usually gathers at The Church of the Nativity on Christmas Eve to see a dramatic parade procession of horsemen, led by police who are mounted on Arabian horses. Following the police in the procession is a lone horseman who carries a cross, followed by churchmen and government officials. Members of the procession solemnly enter the doors of The Church of the Nativity and place an ancient effigy of Jesus in the church. A silver star located deep in an underground cave-like section of the church marks the site where Jesus was born. A star is also set atop a pole in the town's square. In Bethlehem, homes of Christians usually have a cross over the door and a manger scene is usually set up inside the house.

In Germany, home of the Christmas tree tradition, the Christmas tree is not seen until Christmas Eve. The tree is usually kept in a special room, or elsewhere, and decorated in secret with lights, ornaments, tinsels, angels, candies, nuts and cookies. It is then lighted, the presents placed underneath and then shown to the delight of Children on Christmas Eve. In Germany, Dec. 6 is known as St. Nicholas Day when Santa visits the homes of boys and girls. On the day before, Dec. 5, children leave a shoe or boot outside or by the
fireplace for Santa Claus. If they were good, he places gifts and candies inside the shoe. But if they were naughty, children will find twigs or a rod in their shoe. Dinner on Christmas Day includes roast goose, long loaves of bread filled with raisins, nuts and dried fruits. Other sweet delicacies are also enjoyed.

Many traditions in England are similar to those in the United States because such traditions originated in England and were brought to the United States by immigrants. The tradition of sending Christmas greeting cards started in England and is still popular at Christmas, as well as the tradition of neighborhood caroling on Christmas Eve. Children also hang stockings on Christmas Eve in anticipation of Santa Claus filling them with Christmas gifts or treats. The holly, ivy and mistletoe are also used a lot in Christmas decorations. 

In England, the traditional Christmas Dinner is roast turkey, goose or chicken with stuffing, vegetables and roast potatoes. Dessert consists of the British or Christmas pudding with brandy sauce. A rich, fruit-filled Christmas cake may also be enjoyed later in the day. A tradition of pulling Christmas crackers also goes with the serving of food on Christmas Day. A cracker is a paper tube that contains a party hat, riddle, toy or trinket, and is brightly colored and twisted at both ends. It gives out a crack as the contents pop out when it is pulled at each end. Also on Christmas afternoon, the Queen broadcasts a Christmas message to the nation, which is heard on radio and television. The day after Christmas is also a holiday that is known as Boxing Day.


Christmas in Central and South American Nations

In Central and South American nations, which have a fairly large Christian population, the Nativity or Manger Scene is the main decoration in homes at Christmas time. In Mexico, a Christmas tree may also be set up in some homes along with the Nativity scene or Nacimiento. The Christmas tree is usually a small artificial tree, called arbolito. It can also be as simple as a branch cut from a special type of tree or a type of shrub that is then minimally decorated.

The primary Christmas celebration in Mexico is called La Posada. It is a religious procession that dramatizes how Joseph and Mary tried to find a place where Jesus could be born. During the procession, the participants carry images of Mary and Joseph and go from house to house seeking a place to stay. During Midnight Mass, which is called la misa del gallo or 'rooster's mass,' those in attendance sing lullabies to Jesus. On Christmas Day children receive gifts as well as candies that are stuffed into a piñata. This may be one or more sculptures made of papier mache that are hung from the ceiling. Children are blindfolded and take turns hitting the piñata until it breaks and scatters the candies on the floor. All the children then scamper around as they try to get as much candy as they can. Children also receive a gift on Jan. 6 from the Three
Wise Men, if they were good. 

People in Venezuela usually put out pesebres, which show the Nativity scene, on Dec. 16. Early morning church services, called Misa de Aguinaldo, are also common from Dec. 16 to Christmas Eve. After Mass on Christmas Eve, a grand dinner is traditionally enjoyed. I

n Argentina, red and white garlands are used to decorate houses. After attending Midnight Mass, Argentinians have a meal, toast each other, dance and go out to see fireworks. The meal may be roasted pork or turkey, stuffed tomatoes, mince pies, Christmas bread and puddings. Drinks such as cider and juice made from different fruits are used for the toast. Christmas gifts are opened on Christmas Eve just before the family retires to bed.

In Chile, Santa Claus is Father Christmas and is known as 'Viejito Pascuero.' He arrives in a similar but slightly different manner than Santa Claus because his reindeer is pulled by a taxicab. Chileans use small figures made from clay to place near the Christmas tree in a display called pesebre to show the Nativity story. The traditional Christmas dinner includes chicken soup with stuffed potatoes, onions and corn on the cob. Another favorite item is a Christmas bread that is called pan de pasqua and which is made with candies and fruits.

Christmas customs in Brazil originate from the many different ethnic groups who make up the country. The Nativity scene is called the Presepio and can commonly be found displayed in homes, churches and stores. Papai Noel, or Father Noel, resides in Greenland and brings gifts at Christmas. He is said to wear silk clothing because Christmas occurs during summer when it is very hot in Brazil. Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve is called Missa do Gallo, because the coming day is announced by the rooster and the Mass finishes at 1 am on the following day. A traditional Christmas dinner, called Ceia de Natal, includes ham, turkey,
colored rice, a variety of vegetables and fruit dishes. Christmas Day Mass at Catholic churches are mainly held in the late afternoon because people enjoy sleeping late or going to the beach after having Christmas dinner. Christmas festivities, which include folk dancing and singing, continue until January 6th, which is called Three Kings Day.

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Common Core Released Reading Test: Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11

Common Core Released Reading Test
Common Core Released Reading Test: Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11

Common Core ELA reading released test with reading comprehension test questions and answers keys. Use the Common Core released ELA READING test and student study guides, students reading test answer samples, and free teacher resources below to prepare students for the 2016 Common Core reading ELA test.

** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grade 3 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 03 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 03 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 03 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 03 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 03 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 03 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 03 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 03 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 03 ELA - S/M Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 03 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 03 Math - EOY - Item Set
Grade 03 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF658050
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - 0518-M00816
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M00553
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 0435-M01415
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - M00819
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - 0079-M00419
Grade 03 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - VF442639

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 4-5 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics

Grade 04 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 04 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 04 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 04 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 04 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 04 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 04 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 04 ELA - S/M Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 04 ELA -M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 04 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 04 Math - EOY - Item Set


Grade 04 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF643125
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - M02080
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M00778
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 0493-M02313Y
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - 0228-M00781
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - M02320
Grade 04 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - VF565302

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 4-5 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 05 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 05 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 05 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 05 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 05 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 05 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 05 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 05 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 05 ELA - S/M Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 05 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 05 Math - EOY - Item Set
Grade 05 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 10 - 0161-M00840
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - M01285
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - M02372
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - VF908065
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - VF735884
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF822728
Grade 05 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - VF646620

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 06 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 06 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 06 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 06 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 06 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 06 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 06 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 06 Math - EOY - Item Set
Grade 06 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF888578
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - M21482
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - 1167-M20992
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - VF886112
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - M20483
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - VF799733
Grade 06 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - VF643084

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics

Grade 07 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 07 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 07 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - M/L Informational Set - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 07 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 07 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 07 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 07 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 07 Math - EOY - Item Set
Grade 07 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Resources - Item 11 - VF650458
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF560696
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M20592
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - M21521
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF654249


Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - H030360
Grade 07 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - M21894


*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics

Grade 08 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 08 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 08 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 08 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 08 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 08 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 08 Math - EOY - Alignment Document
Grade 08 Math - EOY - Item Set
Grade 08 Math - EOY - Key
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Alignment Document
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Item Set
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Key
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF525935
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - 1419-M21875
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - M20534
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - 1175-M21072
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - 1336-M21831
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - VF654810
Grade 08 Math - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - VF821999
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Item Set
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Key
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Item Set
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Key
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF886999
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF736473
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M44105
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 2863-M42341
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF650047
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - 2391-M41689
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - M41195

** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 09 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 09 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 09 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 09 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 09 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 09 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Item Set
HS Algebra 1 - EOY - Key
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Item Set
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Key
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF886999
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF736473
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M44105
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 2863-M42341
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF650047
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - 2391-M41689
HS Algebra 1 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - M41195
HS Geometry - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Geometry - EOY - Item Set
HS Geometry - EOY - Key
HS Geometry - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Geometry - PBA - Item Set
HS Geometry - PBA - Key
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF800122
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - 2159-M40884
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M41170
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 2104-M40767
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF867187
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 -2071-M40550
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - 2221-M41124P
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - VH003506

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 10 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 10 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 10 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 10 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 10 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 10 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Key
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Key
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VH029260
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF884971
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M44085
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample student Responses - Item 14 - VF650068
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF641201
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - M44168
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - 2457-M41997
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - 2092-M40742
HS Geometry - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Geometry - EOY - Item Set
HS Geometry - EOY - Key
HS Geometry - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Geometry - PBA - Item Set
HS Geometry - PBA - Key
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VF800122
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - 2159-M40884
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M41170
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 14 - 2104-M40767
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF867187
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 -2071-M40550
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - 2221-M41124P
HS Geometry - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - VH003506

*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: English Language Arts/Literacy Released Items
*** Guide to Understanding Scoring: Mathematics Released Items
- Scoring Rubric: Grades 6-11 – English Language Arts/Literacy
- Scoring Rules: English Langauge Arts / Literacy
- Scoring Rules: Mathematics
Grade 11 ELA - Conventions - Sample Student Responses
Grade 11 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - Literary Analysis Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 11 ELA - Literary Text Set - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - M/L Informational Text Set - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - Narrative Writing Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 11 ELA - Paired Text Set - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Item Set
Grade 11 ELA - Research Simulation Task - Sample Student Responses
Grade 11 ELA - S/M Informational Text Set - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - EOY - Key
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Alignment Document
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Item Set
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Key
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 11 - VH029260
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 12 - VF884971
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 13 - M44085
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample student Responses - Item 14 - VF650068
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 15 - VF641201
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 16 - M44168
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 17 - 2457-M41997
HS Algebra 2 - PBA - Sample Student Responses - Item 18 - 2092-M40742


2015 Grade 3 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (1.64 MB)
2015 Grade 4 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (1.71 MB)
2015 Grade 5 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (2.14 MB)
2015 Grade 6 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (1.75 MB)
2015 Grade 7 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (4.34 MB)
2015 Grade 8 English Language Arts Test Released Questions (2.06 MB)
2015 Grade 3 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.78 MB)
2015 Grade 4 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.53 MB)
2015 Grade 5 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.47 MB)
2015 Grade 6 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.64 MB)
2015 Grade 7 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.47 MB)
2015 Grade 8 Mathematics Test Released Questions (1.8 MB)


Example of the Reading Comprehension trait from the grades 6-11 rubric:

• Reading Comprehension of Key Ideas and Details:

■ Score Point 4 ● The student response demonstrates full comprehension of ideas stated explicitly and inferentially by providing an accurate analysis and supporting the analysis with effective and convincing textual evidence.

■ Score Point 3 ● The student response demonstrates comprehension of ideas stated explicitly and/ or inferentially by providing a mostly accurate analysis, and supporting the analysis with adequate textual evidence.

■ Score Point 2 ● The student response demosntrates basic comprehension of ideas stated explicitly and/or inferentially by providing a generally accurate analysis and supporting the analysis with basic textual evidence. ■ Score Point 1 ● The student response demonstrates limited comprehension of ideas stated explicitly and/or inferentially by providing a minimally accurate analysis and supporting the analysis with limited textual evidence.

■ Score Point 0 ● The student response demonstrates no comprehension of ideas by providing inaccurate or no analysis and little to no textual evidence.