Sunday, December 18, 2016

PROGRESS MONITORING IEP, ISP, RtI, SST/SAP

Progress Monitoring IEP, ISP, SST/SAP and RtI Goals and Objectives. 1st Quarter. 2nd Quarter. 3rd Quarter. 4th Quarter.

Ongoing quarterly progress monitoring is the key to helping all students succeed and make great gains! Closing the achievement gap starts with SMART goals and instructional practices that match the learning goals and objectives! Students that struggle academically have gaps in literacy, numeracy, language, word knowledge, and communication. SST/SAP, ISP, IEP, and RtI all rely on quality formative progress monitoring. Educating your staff and parents about progress monitoring procedures and the requirements is the first step in helping students, teachers, and parents succeed.

IEP: The 'Individualized Education Program, also called the IEP, is
a document that is developed for each public school child who needs special education. The IEP is created through a team effort, reviewed periodically. In the United States, this program is known as an Individualized Education Program (IEP).

RtI: Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tier intervention that identifies and supports students with learning and behavior needs.

SST: The Student Success Team (SST) is a problem-solving team that looks for ways to support students and families.

ISP: The Individual Success Plan helps participants remove obstacles and create a clear academic pathway, positively impacting student success.

IDEA Progress Monitoring Procedures

Sharon Hawthorne 515-281-3946 sharon.hawthorne@iowa.gov
Explanation
According to IDEA and State Rules, progress monitoring procedures must be established for each goal.
Progress Monitoring is the method of formative assessment used to measure student’s progress toward meeting a goal.  Progress Monitoring procedures guide how data will be collected in order to make instructional decisions about the progress of the student and establish a decision making plan for examining the data collected.
Progress monitoring assists the teacher or service provider in making ongoing instructional decisions about the strategies being used.  It also provides summative evidence that enables the IEP team to determine whether the student has achieved his or her goals.
Monitoring Progress on IEP Goals
Monitoring progress on IEP goals is described on the goal page in the Progress Monitoring Procedures.  It must include the following:
·                 How progress will be measured?
·                 How often progress will be monitored?
·                 When changes in instruction will be considered?
Alignment
IEP teams need to consider the measure used to determine the baseline performance and the goal criterion.  The measure used for the baseline and goal criterion will determine the measure for progress monitoring.
Example:
Baseline – Given a fifth grade level reading passage, George reads the passage and answers 10 comprehension questions with 10% accuracy.
Annual Measurable Goal – In 36 weeks, given a fifth grade level reading passage, George will read the passage and answer 10 comprehension questions with 90% accuracy on three consecutive data collection dates.
Progress Monitoring Procedures – Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level reading passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.
How will progress be monitored?
When explaining how progress will be monitored, the IEP team must include an explanation of how the student will be demonstrating skills and knowledge
In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded portion states how progress will be monitored:
Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.
How often will progress be monitored?
The IEP team must describe how often a student’s progress will be monitored. Monitoring of IEP goals must be done frequently and regularly.
In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded passage states how often progress will be monitored:
Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.
When will changes in instruction be considered?
The IEP team must include a statement describing when changes in instruction will be considered.
In the following example of a progress monitoring procedure, the bolded passage states when changes in instruction will be considered.

Once a week George will be given a fifth grade level passage to read and ten comprehension questions to answer. The classroom teacher will collect and chart the outcome each week. If four consecutive data points fall below the expected growth line changes in instruction will be considered.
Monitoring Effectiveness of Instruction
Seven to 12 data points are required to make instructional decisions that are statistically valid.  So, in order to have sufficient data points to make a valid instructional decision, data must be collected regularly and frequently.  Behavior data is often collected daily, where academic data is usually collected only once a week.  Anything monitored only monthly would require the whole year in order to make a valid decision.
If progress is monitored daily, effectiveness of instruction may be determined after 2 weeks. (10 data points)
If progress is monitored twice a week, effectiveness of instruction may be determined after 1 month. (8 data points)
If progress is monitored once a week, effectiveness of instruction may be determined within 1 quarter (9 data points).
If progress is monitored quarterly, every 9 weeks, effectiveness of instruction may not be determined, even after a year (4 data points).
Characteristics of Effective Progress Monitoring
·                 Measures the behavior outlined in the goal
·                 Uses an equivalent measure each time
·                 Regular and frequent data collection
·                 Easy to implement
·                 Takes only a short amount of time from instruction
·                 Allows for analysis of performance over time
What methods will be used to collect data?
·                 Student products
·                 Direct observations protocols (rubric, point sheet, etc)
Baseline must be established using the measurement of the student’s performance that you expect by the end of the goal period.  The same measurement using equivalent materials or procedures must be used throughout the monitoring process.
Who will be responsible for the data collection?
Data collection is usually the responsibility of the teacher or direct service provider, however a paraeducator, under the direction of the teacher or service provider, can be trained to collect the data.
Baseline Data
What is baseline data?
Baseline data is stable data that represents the median (middle) score of at least 3 measures.  It is collected in appropriate settings within a relatively short period of time.
Baseline data represents the current level of performance at the beginning of the IEP implementation.  It is the starting point of the goal line on a graph.
Graphing
Why put data on a graph?
·                 Creates documentation and a visual representation of the student’s learning
·                 Provides an easily understood method of showing progress
·                 Provides information to make decisions regarding the effectiveness of the chosen strategies
·                 Helps predict learning rate


 https://www.educateiowa.gov/pk-12/special-education/iowas-guidance-quality-individualized-education-programs-ieps/progress#1

Saturday, December 10, 2016

ppt Building Vocabulary and Language [PPT]

Search Results

Teaching and using rich academic vocabulary in daily lessons increases students language skills, academic achievement, and reading comprehension! Closing the language and word gap is the priority of every teacher that instructs at risk students! Word poverty is the biggest hindrance to school and learning success. Students with limited language and word knowledge will not engage or connect fully with curriculum. Basal reading programs and curriculum will not expose students to academic language at a frequency that students will learn or understand its use and meaning. 





[PPT]Vocabulary: theory, research, and promising practices
Speaking vocabulary; Listening vocabulary; Reading vocabulary; Writing ... new words, thus adding greatly to the number of potential words in the language.

[PPT]Wednesday, June 6th: Vocabulary
5:30-5:45 Academic Vocabulary PowerPoint Presentation ... meanings of words from context is an excellent strategy for learning second language vocabulary. 3.

[PPT]PowerPoint Presentation - Oregon Reading First Center
The presentation will focus on providing teachers with strategies both within their ... Guidelines for ELL Instruction: Vocabulary Development and Oral Language.

[PPT]PowerPoint Presentation - Building Vocabulary
Building Vocabulary. A research-informed, classroom-tested strategy for pre-teaching critical words. The limits of my language are the limits of my mind.

[PPT][.PPT] Vocabulary Building
Oct 5, 2009 - Use the Library to find other resources for building your vocabulary. Bookstores have “Word for Today” calendars, crossword puzzles, and vocabulary word card boxes. 6. USE your words from time to time in conversations.

[PPT]PowerPoint Presentation - Building Vocabulary
Determine critical terms to be explicitly taught. Keep the list short. Teach students meaningful work parts- prefixes, suffixes, and roots (handouts sent). Students must participate actively and accountably in explicit vocabulary instruction to process words more deeply. Reinforce use of vocabulary multiple times.
[PPT]Building Vocabulary ppt
Building Vocabulary. Cindy Gwinn. Staff Development. Fun With Words! The man who recently fell into an upholstery machine is now fully recovered. Dictionary ...
[PPT]Building Vocabulary (Gunning)
Higher-level Texts Use Challenging Vocabulary; Need Increases as Students Progress ... BuildingExperiential Background; Relating Vocabulary to Background ...
Building Vocabulary for Better Literacy. Literacy. Toolkit. Activity 1: Spend 2-3 minutes teaching each other a new word –. Do NOT write your new word down.
[PPT]Vocabulary.ppt
Themes or general categories of effective vocabulary instruction ... Present a way for students to interact with the word to initiate building connections to their ...
[PPT]Building Vocabulary
Vocabulary is the body of words known by the speaker of a language. Receptive vocabulary is the word meanings recognized in context. Expressive vocabulary ...
[PPT]Using Academic Vocabulary to Increase Student Achievement
Using Academic Vocabulary Strategies to Increase Student Achievement. Presented by: .... BuildingAcademic Vocabulary Six Step Process for Teaching New ...

native language vs. foreign language;. developing writing skills;; teaching vocabulary. A person's proficiency in a language refers to the degree to which that ...

[PPT]Downloadable PowerPoint - Florida Center for Reading Research
Oral language skills (vocabulary, linguistic comprehension). Extent of conceptual and factual knowledge. Knowledge and skill in use of cognitive strategies to ...

[PPT]PowerPoint Presentation - OWL
An idiom is a group of words that is language specific and that does not ... one of which is about vocabulary and appropriate language in academic writing.

[PPT]Graves on Vocabulary (PPT)
Petty, Herold, and Stoll on the Importance of Vocabulary (1967) ... Language and reading both act as the tools of thought to bring representation to a new level ...

[PPT]Academic Language Webinar - PowerPoint slides ... - ISNetworkED.org.
Understanding the Role of Academic Language within Literacy Development and ... Vocab, syntax and discourse are the tools used to accomplish the language ...

Monday, December 5, 2016

Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary Test Vocabulary

Tier 2 Academic “Question” Vocabulary and Phrases Test Analysis for Grade 4 and 5

Students will fail all or most TerraNova, STAAR, SAT, FCAT,
PARCC, SBAC Smarter Balance, and Common Core reading assessment if they do not understand the tier 2 academic vocabulary and phrasing used on reading comprehension test questions! 


This is a quick look at the tier 2 vocabulary found in grade 4 and 5 reading assessment. 

facts, figures ”data”, statement, supports, phrase, detail, demonstrate, suggest, summarizes, function, evidence, structural elements, opposite, react, provides evidence, character trait, quotation, theme[s], explanation, explains, mainly organized, article, structure in the answer, difference between, best describes, understand the meaning, statements describe, main idea, best summary, best supports, events, phrase best describes, main character[s], main theme, article provides evidence, key details, which two sentences, include, author uses evidence, which evidence, narrator’s, contribute, comparison, phrase...mean, overall structure, refer, main difference between, which two details, narrator’s point of view, influence the events, provide overall structure of the passage, two main ideas, which two quotations, select two details, two pieces of evidence, challenge, most influence, narrator’s point of view, statement explains, provides support, expresses the main idea, provides evidence, author used evidence, main reason, narrator’s attitude towards, gradual change, development of the plot, similar way, statement expresses theme, according to the author, central idea, author’s primary purpose, author makes the claim, main strategy, develop the claim, supports the idea, choose a central idea, which piece of evidence, intend to support, best states a theme, which option describes, as it is used, relationship between, author develops … point of view, and emphasize a common central idea.