Friday, September 9, 2011

Blooms Taxonomy Questions Stems for Teachers and Students


Blooms Taxonomy Questions Stems for Teachers and Students 

Creating a dialogue with the literature using Blooms higher level questions!

Bloom's Taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education proposed in 1956 by a committee of educators chaired by Benjamin Bloom who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals (referred to as simply "the Handbook" below). Although named for Bloom, the publication followed a series of conferences from 1949 to 1953, which were designed to improve communication between educators on the design of curricula and examinations.

It refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). Bloom's Taxonomy divides educational objectives into three "domains": Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor (sometimes loosely described as knowing/head, feeling/heart and doing/hands respectively). Within the domains, learning at the higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels. A goal of Bloom's Taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education. source wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom%27s_Taxonomy

Reading Comprehension
Connections: Go beyond the text. Apply knowledge of links and connections from text to text or from the text to the world.
  • Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing
    • Which resources would be most likely to give you more information about...?
  • Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/ differences, classifying, and sequencing
    • Which experience is most similar to...'s experience in the selection?
    • In what way are these selections the same?
    • Which experience is most similar to the author's?
    • What modern symbol can be used to compare... to...?
    • How are... and... similar?
  • Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem
    • A theme of both selections might be....
    • What other things cause...?
  • Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/ relationships/ patterns, and main idea
    • Which experience most likely helped the author write this...?
    • How do you think... felt after...?
    • What are some effects that people experience because of this...?
    • People who ... would most likely have which characteristics?
    • Who would most likely need...?
  • Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
    • How would this experience help... the next time s/he...?
    • How do you think this experience will change in the future?
    • Which is an example of an activity that would result in...?
    • Which would most people who share this author's opinion believe?
    • What are some other ways... could have...?
  • Integrating questions focus on connecting/combining/summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
    • Which relationship is most similar to the relationship below? X:Y (based on personal knowledge, initial relationships from text, others from outside experience)
    • ...'s relationship to... is most like....
  • Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
    • What is the most likely reason... instead of...?
    • What part of this selection could be true in real life?
Critical Stance: Evaluate the author's craft. Analyze by determining the impact of literary elements/word choice/purpose/decisions, comparing and contrasting, and evaluating the accuracy of information and ideas.
  • Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing
    • Which words used in the selection were designed to arouse emotion? Which emotion?
  • Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/differences, classifying, and sequencing
    • How is... different from...?
    • What do... and... have in common?
    • Which word would have been a better word choice in this sentence?
  • Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem
    • What are some specific elements of this author's style?
    • What technique does the author use to create an effect? (a dramatic beginning, short quick sentences, long sentences, repetition)
    • This is an example of...? (technical language, dialect, informal speech, formal speech)
    • What supporting evidence does... give for her/his argument?
    • What is the impact of the organization of the selection?
    • Why does the author use flashbacks?
    • What generalization does the author probably want you to make about...?
    • In the statement..., why is the word... in (quotation marks, italics, bold, etc.)?
  • Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/ relationships/ patterns, and main idea
    • How does... change from the beginning to the end of the selection? (Also considered an interpretation)
    • What is the effect of beginning the selection with... (simile)?
    • Based on the information in the selection, which relationship is most similar to the relationship below? X:Y (based on the selection and all relationships found in the text)
    • The way that this character is described suggests that s/he is ....
    • What technique does the author use to make his selection colorful? (precise details, short sentences, dialect, figurative language)
    • The author alludes to....
    • ... is a symbol of what?
    • What is the message of this ironic selection?
    • What is ...'s attitude to...?
    • What is the most likely reason the... is included in the selection?
    • What is the impact of the author's word choice?
    • What is the impact of the use of a propaganda technique?
    • Which statement is the main idea of paragraph...?
    • What evidence reflects the author's biases?
    • Why does the author compare... to...?
    • Why did the author choose this title?
    • Why does the author use... as a symbol for...?
    • What could the author have added that would make his/her position stronger?
    • How is the selection organized?
    • Why did the author choose to use dialect in this selection?
    • What effect does... have on the selection?
    • What is the purpose of comparing... to...?
    • In what way does the author of this selection best help the reader to understand...?
Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
    • How does... justify his/her position?
    • What impact does the author's use of foreshadowing have on the selection?
    • In what way could the author make... more believable?
    • Why does the author most likely (include...?) (begin/end the selection by saying...?) (mention...?)
  • Integrating questions focus on connecting/combining/summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
    • How are ...'s and ...'s feelings at the end of this selection similar?
    • What are some things the author does to make sure this selection... (entertains, informs, persuades, etc.)?
    • Which details offer support of the author's suggested solution?
    • What are some details the author uses to help you visualize the images in the selection?
  • Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
    • Which ... does the author believe is the most important reason for...?
    • Which details are most relevant to the author's point of view?
    • What could the author have added to make her/his opinion more valid?
    • Which detail is irrelevant to the author's judgment?
    • With which statement would the author most likely agree?
Cognition: Develop an initial understanding. Identify purpose, main ideas, supporting details, vocabulary in context, parts of books.
  • Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing
    • Based on the context of paragraph ..., what does... mean? (vocabulary in context)
    • Which best describes...? (clearly stated in the selection)
    • What metaphor does the author use to compare... to...?
    • Which word would best be substituted for the word... in paragraph/line...?
    • When and where did this event occur?
    • What is the selection supposed to help you do?
    • What does the word... mean in paragraph...?
    • Which clue helped you determine the meaning of the word... as it is used in this selection?
    • What is the purpose of guidewords?
    • How is the text organized?
    • When the author uses the word..., which meaning does s/he want you to associate with it?
    • What is the plot of this selection?
    • How would you describe...?
    • What is another meaning for the word...?
    • What is the purpose of the stage directions?
    • What kind of source would you use to find information about...?
    • What is the rhyme scheme?
    • Who is the speaker in this selection?
  • Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/differences, classifying, and sequencing
    • Which detail best completes the graphic organizer?
    • The author compares... to...?
    • What are some words the author uses that are clues to his/her feelings?
    • What is the difference between a primary source and a secondary source?
    • What are the characteristics of this specific genre that make it different from others?
  • Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem
    • What is the purpose of the ... subheading in the selection?
    • Which is an example of figurative language?
    • Which details support her/his opinion?
    • What is the extended metaphor the author uses?
    • What did the author want you to consider as you read this selection?
  • Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/relationships/patterns, and main idea
    • Why does the selection include illustrations/a list of materials, etc.?
    • What is the main idea of the selection? (purpose, summary)
    • What piece of information is missing from the selection?
    • What is the author's purpose?
    • Which are the most important reasons for...?
    • What is the author's message?
    • Which is the best statement of the theme of this selection?
    • What significance does the title have?
    • What is the main problem or conflict in the selection?
    • What does... symbolize in this selection?
    • If this skit was performed, what costumes would the characters wear?
  • Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
    • What can you tell from the dialogue about...?
    • Why did the author write this selection?
  • Integrating questions focus on connecting/combining/summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
      • Why did the author write this selection?
      • Based on the information in the selection, how would you describe...?
      • Which is the best summary for this selection?
      • What is the author's general attitude about...?
      • What are the multiple effects of...?
      • What does the author think about this topic?
  • Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
    • Which is the most important reason for...?
Interpretation: Dig deeper. Clarify, explain by making inferences, drawing conclusions, making generalizations and predictions, determining meaning of figurative language.
  • Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing
    • During the selection, the mood changes from... to....
    • Which word means the same as...?
    • Based on the selection, which is the best definition of...?
    • Which words can the author use that has a more positive connotation?
    • How did the plot develop?
    • What does... think about...?
    • What is... (part of the selection) supposed to help you do?
    • How did... feel at the end of this selection?
    • Why did...?
  • Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/ differences, classifying, and sequencing
    • How is... different from...?
    • Which detail belongs in the empty circle?
    • People who... are most likely to have which characteristics?
    • How are... (e.g., a modern fable) and... (e.g., an ancient fable) different?
  • Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem
    • What is the tone/mood of this selection?
    • How did... solve the problem?
    • What will be the result of this step in the directions?
    • In what ways are these ideas important to the topic/theme?
    • How does the setting impact the mood or tone?
    • Why does the author compare this problem to...?
    • How does the author's use of... (irony, humor, personification) contribute to...?
    • Which... is an example of...?
    • How is informational text organized differently from narrative text?
    • What are strategies for reading...?
    • What is the result of...?
    • In which part of the selection does the author give information about what happened before the selection began?
  • Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/ relationships/ patterns, and main idea
    • What is the significance of ...'s decision to...?
    • What was the significance of ...?
    • Which statement about... is supported by the selection?
    • Which best describes...? (not clearly stated in the selection)
    • Which quotation from the selection tells the most about...?
    • This character could be described as...?
    • What is the main problem?
    • What caused this event/problem?
    • Which detail explains the significance of...?
    • What is the significance of the author's statement that...?
    • Which particular group is the author targeting?
    • What caused... to...? Use information from the selection to support your answer.
    • Which... does the author offer as evidence of the effect of...?
    • What has been the effect of ...'s decision, actions, etc.?
    • What mood does the author create? How?
    • What is most likely true about...?
    • In which situation would you use this ...?
    • What is most likely the reason...?
    • Which is the most important information about... given in the selection?
    • What lesson should... have learned from his/her experience with...?
    • What is the lesson that the reader can learn from this selection?
    • According to the selection, how does ... affect...?
    • What is the main message of this selection?
    • What is the main reason...?
    • Which characteristics are given to...?
    • Why was... important to...?
  • Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
    • What conclusion about ... can be made from...?
    • What might be inferred from the fact that...?
    • Where might the author have gotten the idea for this selection?
    • What is another viable solution to this problem?
    • What might be another cause that is suggested but not clearly stated?
    • What will most likely happen? ...next? if...?
    • What could you infer about the author from this information?
    • With which opinion would the author probably agree?
    • If..., what else would be true?
    • What was most likely the situation at the beginning of the selection?
    • What is the selection meant to explain?
    • What does the final paragraph/stanza suggest about...?
    • Which... best expresses ...'s attitude toward ... as shown in the beginning of the selection?
  • Integrating questions focus on connecting/combining/summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
    • How would the mood change if the setting were...?
    • How would ...'s actions be different if the setting were...?
    • Which group of people might this problem impact most?
    • Why is this information significant to this topic?
    • What can a reader tell about... from...?
  • Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
    • What could the author add to this selection to help you understand it better?
    • Which theme best fits the story?
    • Which facts and details that support the author's view are relevant?
    • Which statement is true?
    • Which... is most important in this selection?
 Blooms Question Stems are Part of The North Carolina Reading Standards

Tier 3 Academic Vocabulary & Phrases to Target:




  • ad claims
  • advertisement/product
  • allude(s)
  • associate/associations
  • author’s view/ message/ general attitude/style
  • biases/biased
  • causes and effects
  • clue(s)
  • character/characteristics
  • compares/comparisons; compare and contrast
  • connotation
  • context
  • contribute/contributions
  • costumes
  • details (precise; in graphic organizers)
  • dialect
  • dialogue
  • effect(s)/multiple effects
  • elements
  • emotions/arouse emotion
  • entertains vs. informs vs. persuades
  • evidence/relevant evidence/supporting evidence
  • exaggeration/exaggerate
  • faulty judgment
  • figurative language
  • flashback
  • foil
  • foreshadow
  • free verse
  • generalization
  • genre/ kind of text
  • groups authors target
  • guidewords
  • humor
  • illustrations
  • impact(s)
  • infer/inferences
  • informal speech vs. formal speech
  • informational text vs. narrative text
  • interpret
  • irony/ironic
  • justify
  • main idea/ purpose/ summary
  • main problem/conflict
  • metaphor/extended metaphor
  • modern fable vs. ancient fable
  • onomatopoeia
  • opinion vs. fact
  • personification
  • plot
  • point of view/ alternative point of view
  • primary/ secondary sources
  • prior knowledge
  • propaganda
  • reading strategies
  • relationships (personal, initial, outside, in text)
  • relevant/ relevance vs. irrelevance/ irrelevant information
  • resolution
  • resources
  • rhyme scheme
  • setting
  • significance
  • situations
  • stage directions
  • subheading
  • substitute(s)
  • symbol/ symbolism/ symbolic/ symbolize
  • technical language
  • technique
  • text organization/ effective organization
  • theme
  • thesaurus
  • tone/ mood
  • unreliable sources/ witnesses
  • useful information
  • valid
  • viable solution
  • visualize the images 
The Creative Reading Methodology, originally inspired by Paulo Freire's work, sees reading as a dialogue with the text, with the reader as an active participant in the dialogue. It recognizes four aspects of questions that will allow students to have a fruitful dialogue with the text, rather than passively accept its information. Students are encouraged to relate the content to their own lives and experiences, to ask the deep critical questions [what do these ideas lead to? who benefits? is everyone included? what would be the consequences? etc] and finally encourage them to use what they have learned through their reflections in future actions. For more information you may want to download this pdf: -Alma Flor Ada
http://almaflorada.com/doc/Creative-Reading.pdf


Student Friendly
Blooms Taxonomy Question Stems

“Extending Children’s Special Abilities 
– Strategies for primary classrooms” 
by Joan Dalton & Smith, D

Knowledge 

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
tell
list
describe
relate
locate
write
find
state
name
What happened after...?
How many...?
Who was it that...?
Can you name the...?
Describe what happened at...?
Who spoke to...?
Can you tell why...?
Find the meaning of...?
What is...?
Which is true or false...?
Make a list of the main events..
Make a timeline of events.
Make a facts chart.
Write a list of any pieces of information you can remember.
List all the .... in the story.
Make a chart showing...
Make an acrostic.
Recite a poem.

Comprehension

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
explain
interpret
outline
discuss
distinguish
predict
restate
translate
compare
describe
Can you write in your own words...?
Can you write a brief outline...?
What do you think could of happened next...?
Who do you think...?
What was the main idea...?
Who was the key character...?
Can you distinguish between...?
What differences exist between...?
Can you provide an example of what you mean...?
Can you provide a definition for...?
Cut out or draw pictures to show a particular event.
Illustrate what you think the main idea was.
Make a cartoon strip showing the sequence of events.
Write and perform a play based on the story.
Retell the story in your words.
Paint a picture of some aspect you like.
Write a summary report of an event.
Prepare a flow chart to illustrate the sequence of events.
Make a coloring book.

Application

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
solve
show
use
illustrate
construct
complete
examine
classify
Do you know another instance where...?
Could this have happened in...?
Can you group by characteristics such as...?
What factors would you change if...?
Can you apply the method used to some experience of your own...?
What questions would you ask of...?
From the information given, can you develop a set of instructions about...?
Would this information be useful if you had a ...?
Construct a model to demonstrate how it will work.
Make a diorama to illustrate an important event.
Make a scrapbook about the areas of study.
Make a Papier-mâché map to include relevant information about an event.
Take a collection of photographs to demonstrate a particular point.
Make up a puzzle game suing the ideas from the study area.
Make a clay model of an item in the material.
Design a market strategy for your product using a known strategy as a model.
Dress a doll in national costume.
Paint a mural using the same materials.
Write a textbook about... for others.

Analysis

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
analyses
distinguish
examine
compare
contrast
investigate
categories
identify
explain
separate
advertise
Which events could have happened...?
I ... happened, what might the ending have been?
How was this similar to...?
What was the underlying theme of...?
What do you see as other possible outcomes?
Why did ... changes occur?
Can you compare your ... with that presented in...?
Can you explain what must have happened when...?
How is ... similar to ...?
What are some of the problems of...?
Can you distinguish between...?
What were some of the motives behind...?
What was the turning point in the game?
What was the problem with...?
Design a questionnaire to gather information.
Write a commercial to sell a new product.
Conduct an investigation to produce information to support a view.
Make a flow chart to show the critical stages.
Construct a graph to illustrate selected information.
Make a jigsaw puzzle.
Make a family tree showing relationships.
Put on a play about the study area.
Write a biography of the study person.
Prepare a report about the area of study.
Arrange a party. Make all the arrangements and record the steps needed.
Review a work of art in terms of form, color and texture.

Synthesis

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
create
invent
compose
predict
plan
construct
design
imagine
propose
devise
formulate
Can you design a ... to ...?
Why not compose a song about...?
Can you see a possible solution to...?
If you had access to all resources how would you deal with...?
Why don't you devise your own way to deal with...?
What would happen if...?
How many ways can you...?
Can you create new and unusual uses for...?
Can you write a new recipe for a tasty dish?
can you develop a proposal which would...
Invent a machine to do a specific task.
Design a building to house your study.
Create a new product. Give it a name and plan a marketing campaign.
Write about your feelings in relation to...
Write a TV show, play, puppet show, role play, song or pantomime about...?
Design a record, book, or magazine cover for...?
Make up a new language code and write material suing it.
Sell an idea.
Devise a way to...
Compose a rhythm or put new words to a known melody.

Evaluation

Useful Verbs
Sample Question Stems
Potential activities and products
judge
select
choose
decide
justify
debate
verify
argue
recommend
assess
discuss
rate
prioritize
determine
Is there a better solution to...
Judge the value of...
Can you defend your position about...?
Do you think ... is a good or a bad thing?
How would you have handled...?
What changes to ... would you recommend?
Do you believe?
Are you a ... person?
How would you feel if...?
How effective are...?
What do you think about...?
Prepare a list of criteria to judge a ... show. Indicate priority and ratings.
Conduct a debate about an issue of special interest.
Make a booklet about 5 rules you see as important. Convince others.
Form a panel to discuss views, e.g. "Learning at School."
Write a letter to ... advising on changes needed at...
Write a half yearly report.
Prepare a case to present your view about..
Books By Joan Dalton

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