Friday, September 16, 2011

Student-Friendly Bloom's Taxonomy Question Stems


Student-Friendly Bloom's Taxonomy Question Stems
Grades 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th.

Common Core Standards English Language Arts 

Bloom's Taxonomy is a classification of learning objectives within education proposed in 1956 by a committee of educators chaired by Benjamin Bloom who also edited the first volume of the standard text, Taxonomy of educational objectives: the classification of educational goals (referred to as simply "the Handbook" below). Although named for Bloom, the publication followed a series of conferences from 1949 to 1953, which were designed to improve communication between educators on the design of curricula and examinations.

My New Blooms Charts!
It refers to a classification of the different objectives that educators set for students (learning objectives). Bloom's Taxonomy divides educational objectives into three "domains": Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor (sometimes loosely described as knowing/head, feeling/heart and doing/hands respectively). Within the domains, learning at the higher levels is dependent on having attained prerequisite knowledge and skills at lower levels. A goal of Bloom's Taxonomy is to motivate educators to focus on all three domains, creating a more holistic form of education. source wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloom%27s_Taxonomy


My Old Blooms Charts!
Student-Friendly Blooms Taxonomy Question Stems

Reading Comprehension Connections: Students need to go beyond
the text and find the deeper meaning and understanding of complex concepts. Teacher need to use HOT (Higher Order Thinking) question stems while reading to develop students reasoning skills, connecting prior knowledge with new information. Questions Stems help Students Apply New Thinking Comprehension Strategies, Building Background Knowledge, Develop Effective Questioning Skills, Reflective Thinking Skills, and Making Connections with Complex Texts. Reading Comprehension Questions: Text to Self, Text to Text, Text to World.



Knowing questions focus on making clear, recalling, naming and listing
  1. Which resources would give more information about ...? 
  2. Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/differences, classifying, and order 
  3. Which experience is most similar to ...'s experience in the story? 
  4. In what way are these stories the same? 
  5. Which experience is most similar to the author's? 
  6. What modern symbol can be used to compare... to...? 
  7. How are... and... similar? 
  8. Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem 
  9. A theme of both selections might be... 
  10. What other things cause...? 

Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, qualities/ relationships/ patterns, and main idea
  1. Which experience most likely helped the author write this...? 
  2. How do you think... felt after...? 
  3. What are some effects that people experience because of this...? 
  4. People who ... would most likely have which characteristics? 
  5. Who would most likely need...? 
  6. Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and adding more details 
  7. How would this experience help... the next time he...? 
  8. How do you think this experience will change in the future? 
  9. Which is an example of an activity that would result in...? 
  10. Which would most people who share this author's opinion believe? 
  11. What are some other ways... could have...? 
Integrating questions focus on connecting/combining/summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information 
  1. Which relationship is most similar to the relationship below? X:Y (based on personal knowledge, initial relationships from text, others from outside experience) ...'s relationship to... is most like... 
Evaluation of the Author's Skills: Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
  1. What is the most likely reason... instead of... ? 
  2. What part of this story could happen in real life? (Or not happen in real life?) 
  3. Critical Stance: Evaluate the author's craft. Analyze by determining the impact of literary elements/word choice/purpose/decision, comparing and contrasting, and evaluating the accuracy of information and ideas. 
  4. Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing 
  5. Which words aroused emotion? Which emotion? 
Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities /differences, classifying, and putting in order

  1. How is... different from...? 
  2. What do... and ... have in common? 
  3. Which word would have been a better word to use in this sentence? 
  4. Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem 
  5. What are some specific elements of this author's style? 
  6. What technique does the author use to create an effect? (a dramatic beginning, short quick sentences, long sentences, repetition) 
  7. This is an example of...? (technical language, slang, informal speech, formal speech) 
  8. What supporting evidence does... give for her argument? 
  9. What is the impact of the organization of the selection? 
  10. Why does the author use flashbacks? 
  11. What generalization does the author probably want you to make about... ? 
  12. In the statement..., why is the word... in (quotations marks, italics, bold, etc.)? 
  13. Why is ... in italics? (or underlined?) 
Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying qualities /relationships /patterns, and main idea

  1. How does... change from the beginning to the end of the story? (Also considered an interpretation) 
  2. What is the effect of beginning the selection with a... (simile/metaphor)? 
  3. Based on the information in the selection, which relationship is most similar to the relationship below? X:Y (based on the selection and all relationships found in the text) 
  4. What technique does the author use to make his selection colorful? (precise details, short sentences, slang, figurative language) 
  5. How does the author make the story colorful? 
  6. The author alludes to... ... is a symbol of what? 
  7. What is the message of this ironic selection? 
  8. What is ...'s attitude to...? 
  9. What is the most likely reason the... is included in the selection? 
  10. What is the impact of the author's word choice? 
  11. What words are clue to the author's feelings? 
  12. What is the impact of the use of a propaganda technique? 
  13. Which statement is the main idea of paragraph...? 
  14. What evidence reflects the author's biases? 
  15. Why does the author compare... to...? 
  16. Why did the author choose this title? 
  17. Why does the author use... to stand for...? 
  18. What could the author have added that would made his position stronger? 
  19. How is the selection organized? 
  20. Why did the author choose to use dialect/slang/regional speech in this selection? 
  21. What effect does... have on the selection? 
  22. What is the purpose of comparing... to...? 
  23. In what way does the author of this selection best help the reader to understand...? 

Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
  1. How does... justify her position? 
  2. What impact does the author's use of foreshadowing have on the selection? 
  3. In what way could the author make... more believable? 
  4. Why does the author most likely (include...?)(begin/end the selection by saying...?)(mention...?) 
Integrating questions focus on connecting/ combining/ summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
  1. How are...'s and...'s feelings at the end of this selection similar? 
  2. What are some things the author does to make sure this selection... (entertains, informs, persuades, etc.)? 
  3. Which details offer support of the author's suggested solution? 
  4. What are some details the author uses to help you visualize the images in the selection? 
  5. What details help you to visualize the story? 
Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, standards for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
  1. Which... does the author believe is the most important reason for...? 
  2. What is the author's most important reason for ...? 
  3. Which details are most relevant to the author's point of view? 
  4. What could the author have added to make his opinion more valid? 
  5. Which detail is irrelevant to the author's judgment? 
  6. With which statement would the author most likely agree? 
Cognition: Develop an initial understanding. Identify purpose, main ideas, supporting details, vocabulary in context, parts of books.

Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming and listing

1. Based on the context of paragraph..., what does... mean? (vocabulary in context)
2. Which best describes...? (clearly stated in the selection)
3. What metaphor does the author use to compare... to...?
4. Which word would best be substituted for the word... in paragraph/line...?
5. When and where did this story occur?
6. What is the selection supposed to help you do?
7. What does the word... mean in paragraph...?
8. Which clue helped you determine the meaning of the word... as it is used in this selection?
9. What is the purpose of guide words?
10. How is the text organized?
11. When the author used the word..., which meaning does she want you to associate with it?
12. What is the plot of the story?
13. Based on this story, how would you describe...?
14. What is another meaning for the word...?
15. What is the purpose of the stage directions?
16. What kind of source would you use to find information about...?
17. What is the rhyme scheme?
18. Who is the speaker in this selection?
19. What can you tell from the conversation about ... ?

Organizing question focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/ differences, classifying, and putting in order

  1. Which detail best completes the graphic organizer? 
  2. The author compares... to...? 
  3. What are some words the author uses that are clues to her feelings? 
  4. What is the difference between a primary source and a secondary source? 
  5. What are the characteristics of this specific genre that make it different from others? 
  6. Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem 
  7. What is the purpose of the... subheading in the selection? 
  8. Which details support his opinion? 
  9. What is the extended metaphor the author uses? 
  10. What did the author want you to consider as you read this selection?
Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/ relationships/ patterns, and main idea
  1. Why does the selection include illustrations/a list of materials, etc.? 
  2. What is the main idea of the selection? (purpose, summary) 
  3. What piece of information is missing from the selection? 
  4. What is the author's purpose? 
  5. Which is the most important reason for... ? 
  6. What is the author's message? 
  7. Which is the best statement of the theme of this selection? 
  8. What significance does the title have? 
  9. What is the main problem or conflict in the selection? 
  10. What does... symbolize in this selection? 
  11. If this skit was performed, what costumes would the characters wear? 
Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
  1. What can you tell from the dialogue/conversation about...? 
  2. Why did the author write this selection? 
Integrating questions focus on connecting/ combining/ summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
  1. Why did the author write this selection? 
  2. Based on the information in the selection, how would you describe...? 
  3. Which is the best summary for this selection? 
  4. What is the author's general attitude about...? 
  5. What are the multiple effects of...? 
  6. What does the author think about this topic? 

Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims
  1. Which is the most important reason for...? 
Interpretation: Dig deeper. Clarify, explain by making inferences, drawing conclusions, making generalizations and predictions, determining the meaning of figurative language.
  1. Knowing questions focus on clarifying, recalling, naming, and listing 
  2. During the selection, the mood changes from... to... 
  3. Which word means the same as...? 
  4. Based on the selection, which is the best definition of...? 
  5. Which words can the author use that have a more positive connotation? 
  6. How did the plot develop, from the beginning to the end? 
  7. What does... think about...? 
  8. What is... (part of the selection) supposed to help you do? 
  9. How did... feel at the end of this selection? 
  10. Why did...? 
  11. Which is an example of figurative speech? 
Organizing questions focus on arranging information, comparing similarities/differences, classifying, and putting in order 


  1. How is... different from...? 
  2. Which detail belongs in the empty circle? 
  3. People who... are most likely to have which characteristics? 
  4. How are... (e.g., a modern fable) and... (e.g., an ancient fable) different? 
  5. Applying questions focus on prior knowledge to solve a problem 
  6. What is the tone/mood of this selection? 
  7. How did... solve the problem? 
  8. What will be the result of this step in the directions? 
  9. In what ways are these ideas important to the topic/theme? 
  10. How does the setting impact the mood or tone? 
  11. Why does the author compare this problem to...? 
  12. How does the author's use of... (irony, humor, personification) contribute to...? 
  13. Which... is an example of...? 
  14. How is informational text organized differently from a narrative text? 
  15. What are strategies for reading...? 
  16. What is the result of...? 
  17. In which part of the selection does the author give information about what happened before the story began? 
Analyzing questions focus on examining parts, identifying attributes/relationships/patterns, and main idea
  1. What is the significance of...'s decision to...? 
  2. What was the significance of...? 
  3. Which statement about... is supported by the selection? 
  4. Which best describes...?(not clearly stated in the selection) 
  5. Which quotation from the selection tells the most about...? 
  6. This character could be described as...? 
  7. What is the main problem? 
  8. What caused this event/problem? 
  9. Which detail explains the significance of...? 
  10. What is the significance of the author's statement that...? 
  11. Which particular group is the author targeting? 
  12. What caused... to...? Use information from the selection to support your answer. 
  13. Which... does the author offer as evidence of the effect of...? 
  14. What has been the effect of...'s decision, actions, etc. 
  15. What mood does the author create? How? 
  16. What is most likely true about...? 
  17. In which situation would you use this...? 
  18. What is most likely the reason... ? 
  19. Which is the most important information about... given in the selection? 
  20. What lesson should... have learned about...? 
  21. What is the lesson that the reader can learn from this selection? 
  22. According to the selection, how does... affect...? 
  23. What is the main message of this selection? 
  24. What is the main reason...? 
  25. Which characteristics are given to...? 
  26. Why was... important to...? 

Generating questions focus on producing new information, inferring, predicting, and elaborating with details
  1. What conclusion about... can be made from...? 
  2. What might be inferred from the fact that...? 
  3. Where might the author have gotten the idea for this selection? 
  4. What is another possible solution to this problem? 
  5. What might be another cause that is suggested but not clearly stated? 
  6. What will most likely happen? ...next? If...? 
  7. What could you infer about the author from this information? 
  8. With which opinion would the author probably agree? 
  9. If..., what else would be true? 
  10. What was most likely the situation at the beginning of the selection? 
  11. What is the story meant to explain? 
  12. What does the final paragraph/stanza suggest about...? 
  13. Which... best expresses...'s attitude toward ... as shown in the beginning of the selection? 
Integrating questions focus on connecting/ combining/ summarizing information, and restructuring existing information to incorporate new information
  1. How would the mood change if the setting were...? 
  2. How would ...'s actions be different if the setting were...? 
  3. Which group of people might this problem impact most? 
  4. Why is this information significant to this topic? 
  5. What can a reader tell about... from...? 
  6. Evaluating questions focus on reasonableness and quality of ideas, criteria for making judgments, and confirming accuracy of claims 
  7. What could the author add to this selection to help you understand it better? 
  8. Which theme best fits the story? 
  9. Which facts and details that support the author's view are important? 
  10. Which statement is true? Which... is most important in this story?

Reading Comprehension
  1. What resources would give more information about ...?
  2. How are ... and ... similar?
  3. What other things cause .... ?
  4. Who would most likely need ... ?
  5. What are some other ways ... could have ... ?
  6. .......'s relationship to .... is most like ....
  7. What part of the story could happen in real life? (Or not happen in real life?)
  8. How do you think .... felt after ....?

Evaluation of the Author's Skills

  1. Which words aroused emotion? (Which emotion?)
  2. Which word would have been a better word to use in this sentence?
  3. Why is ..... in italics? (or underlined?)
  4. Why did the author choose this title?
  5. What details help you to visualize the story?
  6. What is the author's most important reason for ..... ?
  7. How does the author make the story colorful? (imagery)
  8. Which statement is the main idea of paragraph .......?

Initial Understanding
  1. What is the plot of the story?
  2. What words are clues to the author's feelings?
  3. Which is an example of figurative speech?
  4. What is the main problem or conflict in the story?
  5. What can you tell from the conversation about ...?
  6. Based on this story, how would you describe ........ ?
  7. Which is the most important reason for .... ?
  8. When and where did this story occur?
  9. How would you describe ... ?
  10. Who is the speaker in ..... ?
Interpretation
  1. How did the plot develop, from the beginning to the end ?
  2. How is ..... different from ..... ?
  3. How did ..... solve the problem?
  4. Why was ..... important?
  5. What is another possible solution to this problem?
  6. What can a reader tell about ... from .... ?
  7. Which .... is most important in this story?
  8. What does .... think about ... ?
  9. In what part of the story does the author give information about what happened before the story began?

  10. What lesson should .... have learned about ....?
  11. Why was .... important to ....?
  12. If ..... , what else would be true?
  13. What is the story meant to explain?

Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs Quiz

Knowledge (Remembering)    
Count, Define, Describe, Draw, Find, Identify, Label, List, Match, Name, Quote, Recall, Recite, Sequence, Tell, Write  

 count  define  describe  draw  find  identify
 label   list  match  name  quote  recall  recite
 tell  write
1.
to discover.
2.
to bring a past event into the mind; remember.
3.
to make a picture of with a pen, pencil, or other writing tool.
4.
to choose a word that will be what someone or something is called.
5.
to express or record by __________.
6.
to speak the words of from memory and in front of others.
7.
to tell or write about; create a picture of in words.
8.
to explain or state the meaning of.
9.
to list or name one by one in order to find the total.
10.
to identify through the use of a __________.
11.
to bring together because of being equal or alike.
12.
to figure out or show who someone is or what something is.
13.
to write down a series of names, numbers, or other items, one after another.
14.
to repeat a passage or information from.
15.
to express in spoken or written words.

Comprehension (Understanding)
Conclude, Demonstrate, Discuss, Explain, Generalize, Identify, Illustrate, Interpret, Paraphrase, Predict, Report, Restate, Review, Summarize, Tell     

Blooms Taxonomy Verb Quiz Comprehension (Understanding) 

Instructions: Write the correct word in the space before its definition. There may be more than one definition for each word.  


 conclude   demonstrate   discuss   explain   generalize

 identify   illustrate  interpret  paraphrase  predict

 report  restate  review  summarize  tell
1.
to restate in somewhat different words.
2.
to figure out or show who someone is or what something is.
3.
to explain or make clear by giving examples.
4.
to come to a broad idea or rule about something after considering particular facts.
5.
to express in spoken or written words.
6.
to bring to an end; finish or complete.
7.
to prepare and present an account or statement of.
8.
to tell in advance that something will happen.
9.
to restate in a concise form.
10.
to explain or describe, especially by modeling or using many examples.
11.
to state again or in a different way.
12.
to make clear in speech or writing; show in detail.
13.
to examine or look over again.
14.
to talk together about.
15.
to decide on or explain the meaning of.
16.
to draw pictures to go along with a book or other written material.


Application (Applying)    
Apply, Change, Choose, Compute, Dramatize, Interview, Prepare, Produce, Role-play, Select, Show, Transfer, Use 

Blooms Taxonomy Verb Quiz Application (Applying)
 apply   change  choose  compute  dramatize
 interview  play  prepare  produce  select  show
 transfer
1.
to display or exhibit.
2.
to make exciting or dramatic, sometimes by exaggerating.
3.
to make or put together from different parts.
4.
to choose; pick.
5.
to make use of or put to use.
6.
to act the part of in a drama.
7.
to put together and present for the public to enjoy.
8.
to move or carry from one person or place to another.
9.
to make different; alter the content or form of.
10.
to pick one or more from a group.
11.
to figure out or calculate by using arithmetic.
12.
to have an __________ with or of.
 
 
Analysis (Analyzing)    
Analyze, Characterize, Classify, Compare, Contrast, Debate, Deduce, Diagram, Differentiate, Discriminate, Distinguish, Examine, Outline, Relate, Research, Separate 
 

Blooms Taxonomy Verb Quiz Analysis (Analyzing)
 analyze  characterize  classify  compare  contrast  debate  deduce
 diagram  differentiate  discriminate  distinguish  examine  outline
 relate  research  separate
1.
to note or describe the similarities or differences of.
2.
to draw (a conclusion) by reasoning from given information or general principles.
3.
to show by a __________.
4.
to look at closely and carefully.
5.
to give the main ideas or topics of.
6.
to discuss the different sides of a subject or issue.
7.
to cause to become different or distinct, especially by changing.
8.
to tell apart by seeing differences (often followed by "from").
9.
to divide into parts or break the connection between.
10.
to compare in order to make differences clear.
11.
to describe the particular character or qualities of; give certain characteristics to.
12.
to separate into parts for close study; examine and explain.
13.
to put or order into groups of similar things.
14.
to see a clear difference; make a distinction.
15.
to see or find connections between; link.
16.
to do __________ into.


Synthesis (Creating)    
Compose, Construct, Create, Design, Develop, Integrate, Invent, Make, Organize, Perform, Plan, Produce, Propose, Rewrite      
 compose  construct  create  design  develop
 integrate  invent  make  organize  perform
 plan  produce  propose  rewrite
1.
to bring together and mix into a whole.
2.
to do or present for the entertainment of an audience.
3.
to bring into being.
4.
to plan for a certain goal or purpose.
5.
to think of, come up with, or create something new.
6.
to put together and present for the public to enjoy.
7.
to create or write.
8.
to think about and decide ahead of time how one is going to do something.
9.
to bring out the potential of; advance to a more complete or more effective condition.
10.
to bring into being by building from separate parts.
11.
to present or suggest as an idea to be considered.
12.
to write again using different words or a different form or style; revise.
13.
to build; put together.
14.
to set in order; arrange in an orderly way.

Evaluation
(Evaluating) 
   

Appraise, Argue, Assess, Choose, Conclude, Critic, Decide, Evaluate, Judge, Justify, Predict, Prioritize, Prove, Rank, Rate, Select

 appraise  argue  assess  choose  conclude
 critic  decide  evaluate  judge  justify
 predict  prioritize  prove  rank  rate s elect
1.
to think about carefully and form an opinion.
2.
to judge the quality or nature of.
3.
to show to be true or correct.
4.
to form an opinion of or about.
5.
to make up one's mind about something; make a choice to do something.
6.
to pick one or more from a group.
7.
anyone who judges or evaluates.
8.
to place in order; classify.
9.
to give reasons for or against something.
10.
to show to be true or right; prove.
11.
to judge or set the worth of.
12.
to put or do in order of priority.
13.
to set or try to find the importance or value of; evaluate; estimate.
14.
to put in a certain rank or order.
15.
to tell in advance that something will happen.
16.
to choose; pick.

1 comment:

  1. This could be a great resource! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you!